Mac Roundtable 37 is Up

Mac Roundtable.png

Once again I added my dulcet tones to the Mac Roundtable with the episode that just published today. I can’t really give myself very high marks this time. I went in fully prepared to talk about my experience setting up a syncing process for multiple macs but upon listening to it, my well thought out ideas came out as an endless string of gibberish. Oh well. Guess that is one more reason to read the blog. Everyone else, however, sounded brilliant. Check it out.

15 Comments Mac Roundtable 37 is Up

  1. marieboyer@comcast.net

    You were brilliant, as always, David. It was you who brought up the whole topic! I enjoyed listening to you guys even though I got lost a bit in “disk images” and “sparse images.” I was relieved to hear Allison, the engineer, confess that her eyes glazed over and she was a bit lost too. I was wishing she had stopped you guys earlier and made you explain some basics like,

    How do you encrypt something on a Mac? (Like how does Katie put all her financial documents into an encrypted disk image?)

    What the heck is a “sparse disk image”? It sounds like something I would not want for backup or archiving because it is “sparse” as opposed to full?

    I thought Allison was going to act as the moderator for those of us who are not uber-geeks when she stopped you right upfront and made you explain what “chrono-sync” was. But her enthusiasm for interruption waned as the discussion became a more fast-paced exchange on this complex topic.

    Sometimes you need to let the conversation on a group podcast like yours just flow. Those of us who are lost are still tuning in because it is important to know that there are things to learn. No doubt Victor will come through with a clarifying studio show on this topic, or Don Mc. will put up a screencast about sync issues.

    I am loving the MacRoundtable. Lately, you guys have been out in front of MacBreak Weekly on some of the hot Mac topics. Your conversation is less social than MacBreak Weekly (although you clearly are good friends and it shows), and more technical and substantive. (Do not get me wrong, I love MacBreak Weekly; it is probably my favorite podcast. On the most recent episode, without Leo as host, the guys were as funny as ever.)

    So, while you guys could have been more user-friendly in this latest episode, I am sure that the uber geeks were enjoying the banter. Those of us who consider ourselves plain-vanilla Mac users might have been a little lost, but at least we know that there will be other shows!

    Thanks for adding to my “must-listen to” Mac podcast list with the MacRoundtable.

    Reply
  2. marieboyer@comcast.net

    You were brilliant, as always, David. It was you who brought up the whole topic! I enjoyed listening to you guys even though I got lost a bit in “disk images” and “sparse images.” I was relieved to hear Allison, the engineer, confess that her eyes glazed over and she was a bit lost too. I was wishing she had stopped you guys earlier and made you explain some basics like,

    How do you encrypt something on a Mac? (Like how does Katie put all her financial documents into an encrypted disk image?)

    What the heck is a “sparse disk image”? It sounds like something I would not want for backup or archiving because it is “sparse” as opposed to full?

    I thought Allison was going to act as the moderator for those of us who are not uber-geeks when she stopped you right upfront and made you explain what “chrono-sync” was. But her enthusiasm for interruption waned as the discussion became a more fast-paced exchange on this complex topic.

    Sometimes you need to let the conversation on a group podcast like yours just flow. Those of us who are lost are still tuning in because it is important to know that there are things to learn. No doubt Victor will come through with a clarifying studio show on this topic, or Don Mc. will put up a screencast about sync issues.

    I am loving the MacRoundtable. Lately, you guys have been out in front of MacBreak Weekly on some of the hot Mac topics. Your conversation is less social than MacBreak Weekly (although you clearly are good friends and it shows), and more technical and substantive. (Do not get me wrong, I love MacBreak Weekly; it is probably my favorite podcast. On the most recent episode, without Leo as host, the guys were as funny as ever.)

    So, while you guys could have been more user-friendly in this latest episode, I am sure that the uber geeks were enjoying the banter. Those of us who consider ourselves plain-vanilla Mac users might have been a little lost, but at least we know that there will be other shows!

    Thanks for adding to my “must-listen to” Mac podcast list with the MacRoundtable.

    Reply
  3. marieboyer@comcast.net

    You were brilliant, as always, David. It was you who brought up the whole topic! I enjoyed listening to you guys even though I got lost a bit in “disk images” and “sparse images.” I was relieved to hear Allison, the engineer, confess that her eyes glazed over and she was a bit lost too. I was wishing she had stopped you guys earlier and made you explain some basics like,

    How do you encrypt something on a Mac? (Like how does Katie put all her financial documents into an encrypted disk image?)

    What the heck is a “sparse disk image”? It sounds like something I would not want for backup or archiving because it is “sparse” as opposed to full?

    I thought Allison was going to act as the moderator for those of us who are not uber-geeks when she stopped you right upfront and made you explain what “chrono-sync” was. But her enthusiasm for interruption waned as the discussion became a more fast-paced exchange on this complex topic.

    Sometimes you need to let the conversation on a group podcast like yours just flow. Those of us who are lost are still tuning in because it is important to know that there are things to learn. No doubt Victor will come through with a clarifying studio show on this topic, or Don Mc. will put up a screencast about sync issues.

    I am loving the MacRoundtable. Lately, you guys have been out in front of MacBreak Weekly on some of the hot Mac topics. Your conversation is less social than MacBreak Weekly (although you clearly are good friends and it shows), and more technical and substantive. (Do not get me wrong, I love MacBreak Weekly; it is probably my favorite podcast. On the most recent episode, without Leo as host, the guys were as funny as ever.)

    So, while you guys could have been more user-friendly in this latest episode, I am sure that the uber geeks were enjoying the banter. Those of us who consider ourselves plain-vanilla Mac users might have been a little lost, but at least we know that there will be other shows!

    Thanks for adding to my “must-listen to” Mac podcast list with the MacRoundtable.

    Reply
  4. marieboyer@comcast.net

    You were brilliant, as always, David. It was you who brought up the whole topic! I enjoyed listening to you guys even though I got lost a bit in “disk images” and “sparse images.” I was relieved to hear Allison, the engineer, confess that her eyes glazed over and she was a bit lost too. I was wishing she had stopped you guys earlier and made you explain some basics like,

    How do you encrypt something on a Mac? (Like how does Katie put all her financial documents into an encrypted disk image?)

    What the heck is a “sparse disk image”? It sounds like something I would not want for backup or archiving because it is “sparse” as opposed to full?

    I thought Allison was going to act as the moderator for those of us who are not uber-geeks when she stopped you right upfront and made you explain what “chrono-sync” was. But her enthusiasm for interruption waned as the discussion became a more fast-paced exchange on this complex topic.

    Sometimes you need to let the conversation on a group podcast like yours just flow. Those of us who are lost are still tuning in because it is important to know that there are things to learn. No doubt Victor will come through with a clarifying studio show on this topic, or Don Mc. will put up a screencast about sync issues.

    I am loving the MacRoundtable. Lately, you guys have been out in front of MacBreak Weekly on some of the hot Mac topics. Your conversation is less social than MacBreak Weekly (although you clearly are good friends and it shows), and more technical and substantive. (Do not get me wrong, I love MacBreak Weekly; it is probably my favorite podcast. On the most recent episode, without Leo as host, the guys were as funny as ever.)

    So, while you guys could have been more user-friendly in this latest episode, I am sure that the uber geeks were enjoying the banter. Those of us who consider ourselves plain-vanilla Mac users might have been a little lost, but at least we know that there will be other shows!

    Thanks for adding to my “must-listen to” Mac podcast list with the MacRoundtable.

    Reply
  5. marieboyer@comcast.net

    You were brilliant, as always, David. It was you who brought up the whole topic! I enjoyed listening to you guys even though I got lost a bit in “disk images” and “sparse images.” I was relieved to hear Allison, the engineer, confess that her eyes glazed over and she was a bit lost too. I was wishing she had stopped you guys earlier and made you explain some basics like,

    How do you encrypt something on a Mac? (Like how does Katie put all her financial documents into an encrypted disk image?)

    What the heck is a “sparse disk image”? It sounds like something I would not want for backup or archiving because it is “sparse” as opposed to full?

    I thought Allison was going to act as the moderator for those of us who are not uber-geeks when she stopped you right upfront and made you explain what “chrono-sync” was. But her enthusiasm for interruption waned as the discussion became a more fast-paced exchange on this complex topic.

    Sometimes you need to let the conversation on a group podcast like yours just flow. Those of us who are lost are still tuning in because it is important to know that there are things to learn. No doubt Victor will come through with a clarifying studio show on this topic, or Don Mc. will put up a screencast about sync issues.

    I am loving the MacRoundtable. Lately, you guys have been out in front of MacBreak Weekly on some of the hot Mac topics. Your conversation is less social than MacBreak Weekly (although you clearly are good friends and it shows), and more technical and substantive. (Do not get me wrong, I love MacBreak Weekly; it is probably my favorite podcast. On the most recent episode, without Leo as host, the guys were as funny as ever.)

    So, while you guys could have been more user-friendly in this latest episode, I am sure that the uber geeks were enjoying the banter. Those of us who consider ourselves plain-vanilla Mac users might have been a little lost, but at least we know that there will be other shows!

    Thanks for adding to my “must-listen to” Mac podcast list with the MacRoundtable.

    Reply
  6. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I listened to most of the MacRoundtable and found it interesting and informative. At one point, you mentioned your screencast on sparse images. I would love it if you would stick with this subject (easy for me to say) and maybe develop a Don McAllister length screencast demonstrating the ins and outs and hows of OS X disk images, Truecrypt, chronosync, .mac, etc. from a synching, backup and security point of view. It is a confusing intersection of data and synching technologies and software but I think you could turn a lot of lights on for a lot of us who would benefit from your research and ability to explain and educate.

    Reply
  7. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I listened to most of the MacRoundtable and found it interesting and informative. At one point, you mentioned your screencast on sparse images. I would love it if you would stick with this subject (easy for me to say) and maybe develop a Don McAllister length screencast demonstrating the ins and outs and hows of OS X disk images, Truecrypt, chronosync, .mac, etc. from a synching, backup and security point of view. It is a confusing intersection of data and synching technologies and software but I think you could turn a lot of lights on for a lot of us who would benefit from your research and ability to explain and educate.

    Reply
  8. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I listened to most of the MacRoundtable and found it interesting and informative. At one point, you mentioned your screencast on sparse images. I would love it if you would stick with this subject (easy for me to say) and maybe develop a Don McAllister length screencast demonstrating the ins and outs and hows of OS X disk images, Truecrypt, chronosync, .mac, etc. from a synching, backup and security point of view. It is a confusing intersection of data and synching technologies and software but I think you could turn a lot of lights on for a lot of us who would benefit from your research and ability to explain and educate.

    Reply
  9. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I listened to most of the MacRoundtable and found it interesting and informative. At one point, you mentioned your screencast on sparse images. I would love it if you would stick with this subject (easy for me to say) and maybe develop a Don McAllister length screencast demonstrating the ins and outs and hows of OS X disk images, Truecrypt, chronosync, .mac, etc. from a synching, backup and security point of view. It is a confusing intersection of data and synching technologies and software but I think you could turn a lot of lights on for a lot of us who would benefit from your research and ability to explain and educate.

    Reply
  10. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I listened to most of the MacRoundtable and found it interesting and informative. At one point, you mentioned your screencast on sparse images. I would love it if you would stick with this subject (easy for me to say) and maybe develop a Don McAllister length screencast demonstrating the ins and outs and hows of OS X disk images, Truecrypt, chronosync, .mac, etc. from a synching, backup and security point of view. It is a confusing intersection of data and synching technologies and software but I think you could turn a lot of lights on for a lot of us who would benefit from your research and ability to explain and educate.

    Reply

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