Delicious Library 2 Review

Delicious icon.jpeg

The last few years a term of art has been floating around the Mac community. You may have heard it. “The Delicious Generation” This phrase comes from a specific application called Delicious Library that released a few years ago and made a lot of people rethink Apple software design. Well recently the folks at Delicious Monster released Delicious Library 2 and it certainly lives up to the high standards set by its predecessor.

So what is this precedent setting software you ask? In essence, it is a home inventory system for your books, CD’s, video games, electronics, tools, toys, and other things precious. I know that doesn’t sound all that exciting but that is what makes Delicious Library 2 so impressive. It does home inventory with panache’.  So let me walk you through it.

Loading up Delicious Library 2 there is a little scanning button. With a click , Delicious activates your iSight camera. You can then take your toys (such as a DVD) and hold the UPC code up to your iSight camera. You hear a satisfying “beep” and then Delicious goes and fetches your title from the internet. It reads the name of your DVD and literally pours the contents on a virtual wooden shelf showing a copy of your DVD. It just doesn’t pull down an image and name though, Delicious grabs tons of metadata ranging from actors, dates, reviews, and even points you to other similar titles you may enjoy. That really is all there is to it. When I scanned in Star Wars it told me “I am your father.” I sat my six year old at the Mac with a stack of DVD’s taller than her and she had them all scanned into Delicious Library 2 in about 30 minutes. Child labor laws aside, getting your stuff in Delicious Library 2 is easy. It was no different loading up the video games and books. Before long, I had most of the family library recorded. You can purchase a separate bluetooth hand held scanner that would probably be a bit faster, but I found the iSight scanning to be very convenient.

Delicious screenshot.png

Not all of your stuff is going to have UPC codes however. For instance, some of my movies started out as DVD cases inside cardboard boxes with UPC codes on them. Well the cardboard boxes are long gone along with the UPC codes so I had nothing to show my iSight camera. Delicious Library has a text entry search that found all of them very quickly and added them into the library. It appears you can catalogue just about anything Amazon sells. Likewise, Delicious Library will grab all of your iTunes library. That is not just the music. It also gets movies, TV programs, and audiobooks.

My library currently only holds about 300 items without breaking a sweat. One of the changes made in Delicious Library 2 is the switch from XML to SQL which should make management of large libraries more efficient.

So by now you are wondering why bother with an application like Delicious Library? There are several practical reasons including things like insurance records and personal inventories but I have to admit I am hooked because it is just fun. I’ve set up smart libraries with different genres of books. I’ve also got them categorized by where they are located which is excellent for someone like me who is easily befuddled. You can manually fill your shelves or use the “Smart Shelves” feature which allows you to set up specific criteria very similar to smart playlists in iTunes.

Delicious also allows you to publish your library to the web or share it with friends. I am working on setting up a shared book library with several of my local friends so get our own informal library running. One of the export options is an iPhone or iPod optimized version so you can put it your library in your pocket. This could come in handy for trips to the bookstore if you have a large library. Another nice feature is you can drag a Delicious Library item on a contact in the OS X address book and it will add a note they they have borrowed an item and add an entry to your iCal. I really wish I had that when I loaned my Indiana Jones DVD collection out a few years ago. Delicious Library will also go onto the Interweb and figure out what all of your stuff is worth (in multiple currencies) and even, if configured, help you sell it through the Amazon store.

You can get a free trial at Delicious Monster. A new license will cost you $40 and an upgrade from version one will cost $20. Delicious Library 2 is one of those applications that I feel in my bones could never exist on a windows box. Even if you are not interested in creating an electronic inventory, download the trial so you can see for yourself how software looks when it is done right.

50 Comments Delicious Library 2 Review

  1. tenex@tesco.net

    I have DL1 but aside from putting stuff in there I never actually use it. It looks good but I don’t think its ‘wow’ software (unless I’m missing something? there wasn’t even any easy way to reskin in DL1) and as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it) boy was that a pain.

    I had more success with books but again ended up typing too many titles as the ISBN couldn’t be found… Oh and to add insult to injury even when the search did locate books I often had to scan the covers in manually and convert etc. because there weren’t images available. That would be over 25% of 200+ books…

    With this experience I couldn’t face scanning in my small selection of CDs!

    OK so all of this sounds negative and I suppose much of it is but to redress the balance I’d say when it does find data on your purchases it does a good job in importing it. I can see that it may be useful for insurance claims etc (will the pretty coloured images mean a higher settlement cheque?) but as I don’t lend media, aside from the cataloguing process I never open the app.

    I’ll have a look at DL2 eventually but the only way I could see this app being truly useful would be if you scanned all your media to a NAS and DL could be somehow integrated to provide the metadata to support playback. Also the categories of collections are too limited – why can’t it be used to automatically inventory my apps and their serial numbers? (Yes I know software is in the latest release but the website doesn’t explain how it works)

    Will I buy it? I’d like to say no but I have a compulsive habit of buying lots of Mac shareware … so I guess I will … eventually.

    Reply
  2. tenex@tesco.net

    I have DL1 but aside from putting stuff in there I never actually use it. It looks good but I don’t think its ‘wow’ software (unless I’m missing something? there wasn’t even any easy way to reskin in DL1) and as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it) boy was that a pain.

    I had more success with books but again ended up typing too many titles as the ISBN couldn’t be found… Oh and to add insult to injury even when the search did locate books I often had to scan the covers in manually and convert etc. because there weren’t images available. That would be over 25% of 200+ books…

    With this experience I couldn’t face scanning in my small selection of CDs!

    OK so all of this sounds negative and I suppose much of it is but to redress the balance I’d say when it does find data on your purchases it does a good job in importing it. I can see that it may be useful for insurance claims etc (will the pretty coloured images mean a higher settlement cheque?) but as I don’t lend media, aside from the cataloguing process I never open the app.

    I’ll have a look at DL2 eventually but the only way I could see this app being truly useful would be if you scanned all your media to a NAS and DL could be somehow integrated to provide the metadata to support playback. Also the categories of collections are too limited – why can’t it be used to automatically inventory my apps and their serial numbers? (Yes I know software is in the latest release but the website doesn’t explain how it works)

    Will I buy it? I’d like to say no but I have a compulsive habit of buying lots of Mac shareware … so I guess I will … eventually.

    Reply
  3. tenex@tesco.net

    I have DL1 but aside from putting stuff in there I never actually use it. It looks good but I don’t think its ‘wow’ software (unless I’m missing something? there wasn’t even any easy way to reskin in DL1) and as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it) boy was that a pain.

    I had more success with books but again ended up typing too many titles as the ISBN couldn’t be found… Oh and to add insult to injury even when the search did locate books I often had to scan the covers in manually and convert etc. because there weren’t images available. That would be over 25% of 200+ books…

    With this experience I couldn’t face scanning in my small selection of CDs!

    OK so all of this sounds negative and I suppose much of it is but to redress the balance I’d say when it does find data on your purchases it does a good job in importing it. I can see that it may be useful for insurance claims etc (will the pretty coloured images mean a higher settlement cheque?) but as I don’t lend media, aside from the cataloguing process I never open the app.

    I’ll have a look at DL2 eventually but the only way I could see this app being truly useful would be if you scanned all your media to a NAS and DL could be somehow integrated to provide the metadata to support playback. Also the categories of collections are too limited – why can’t it be used to automatically inventory my apps and their serial numbers? (Yes I know software is in the latest release but the website doesn’t explain how it works)

    Will I buy it? I’d like to say no but I have a compulsive habit of buying lots of Mac shareware … so I guess I will … eventually.

    Reply
  4. tenex@tesco.net

    I have DL1 but aside from putting stuff in there I never actually use it. It looks good but I don’t think its ‘wow’ software (unless I’m missing something? there wasn’t even any easy way to reskin in DL1) and as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it) boy was that a pain.

    I had more success with books but again ended up typing too many titles as the ISBN couldn’t be found… Oh and to add insult to injury even when the search did locate books I often had to scan the covers in manually and convert etc. because there weren’t images available. That would be over 25% of 200+ books…

    With this experience I couldn’t face scanning in my small selection of CDs!

    OK so all of this sounds negative and I suppose much of it is but to redress the balance I’d say when it does find data on your purchases it does a good job in importing it. I can see that it may be useful for insurance claims etc (will the pretty coloured images mean a higher settlement cheque?) but as I don’t lend media, aside from the cataloguing process I never open the app.

    I’ll have a look at DL2 eventually but the only way I could see this app being truly useful would be if you scanned all your media to a NAS and DL could be somehow integrated to provide the metadata to support playback. Also the categories of collections are too limited – why can’t it be used to automatically inventory my apps and their serial numbers? (Yes I know software is in the latest release but the website doesn’t explain how it works)

    Will I buy it? I’d like to say no but I have a compulsive habit of buying lots of Mac shareware … so I guess I will … eventually.

    Reply
  5. tenex@tesco.net

    I have DL1 but aside from putting stuff in there I never actually use it. It looks good but I don’t think its ‘wow’ software (unless I’m missing something? there wasn’t even any easy way to reskin in DL1) and as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it) boy was that a pain.

    I had more success with books but again ended up typing too many titles as the ISBN couldn’t be found… Oh and to add insult to injury even when the search did locate books I often had to scan the covers in manually and convert etc. because there weren’t images available. That would be over 25% of 200+ books…

    With this experience I couldn’t face scanning in my small selection of CDs!

    OK so all of this sounds negative and I suppose much of it is but to redress the balance I’d say when it does find data on your purchases it does a good job in importing it. I can see that it may be useful for insurance claims etc (will the pretty coloured images mean a higher settlement cheque?) but as I don’t lend media, aside from the cataloguing process I never open the app.

    I’ll have a look at DL2 eventually but the only way I could see this app being truly useful would be if you scanned all your media to a NAS and DL could be somehow integrated to provide the metadata to support playback. Also the categories of collections are too limited – why can’t it be used to automatically inventory my apps and their serial numbers? (Yes I know software is in the latest release but the website doesn’t explain how it works)

    Will I buy it? I’d like to say no but I have a compulsive habit of buying lots of Mac shareware … so I guess I will … eventually.

    Reply
  6. gkorgeski@mac.com

    I love DL1 and so will probably upgrade. One thing it did for me was to solve the problem of too many books (or not enough library shelves?) I buy a few hundred books a year, as does my wife — so we need an actual library building to contain them all. That, or use DL.

    I buy cheap plastic bins at office supply stores, and use them for book storage. I go through the shelves and grab anything I don’t think I’m going to read or to need sometime soon (e.g. within a few months.) I toss these into one of the bins (I even keep a “collecting bin” under my desk, for later cataloging in DL) All I do is enter a bunch of these at a time into DL, toss them into a bin, number the bin and then log that number into the DL database for all the books at once. This gives me a set of “stacks” like my public library has — a pile of bins up in the attic that I can easily access to find the book I “know I have somewhere.”

    So browsing my “library” in DL means browsing the WHOLE library — not just the six or eight shelves of books I have out at any given time. You just have to maintain it — put things back in their bin when done, etc. (But if you needed to just re-catalog things, you can borrow a six-year old and give them your barcode scanner.)

    Reply
  7. gkorgeski@mac.com

    I love DL1 and so will probably upgrade. One thing it did for me was to solve the problem of too many books (or not enough library shelves?) I buy a few hundred books a year, as does my wife — so we need an actual library building to contain them all. That, or use DL.

    I buy cheap plastic bins at office supply stores, and use them for book storage. I go through the shelves and grab anything I don’t think I’m going to read or to need sometime soon (e.g. within a few months.) I toss these into one of the bins (I even keep a “collecting bin” under my desk, for later cataloging in DL) All I do is enter a bunch of these at a time into DL, toss them into a bin, number the bin and then log that number into the DL database for all the books at once. This gives me a set of “stacks” like my public library has — a pile of bins up in the attic that I can easily access to find the book I “know I have somewhere.”

    So browsing my “library” in DL means browsing the WHOLE library — not just the six or eight shelves of books I have out at any given time. You just have to maintain it — put things back in their bin when done, etc. (But if you needed to just re-catalog things, you can borrow a six-year old and give them your barcode scanner.)

    Reply
  8. gkorgeski@mac.com

    I love DL1 and so will probably upgrade. One thing it did for me was to solve the problem of too many books (or not enough library shelves?) I buy a few hundred books a year, as does my wife — so we need an actual library building to contain them all. That, or use DL.

    I buy cheap plastic bins at office supply stores, and use them for book storage. I go through the shelves and grab anything I don’t think I’m going to read or to need sometime soon (e.g. within a few months.) I toss these into one of the bins (I even keep a “collecting bin” under my desk, for later cataloging in DL) All I do is enter a bunch of these at a time into DL, toss them into a bin, number the bin and then log that number into the DL database for all the books at once. This gives me a set of “stacks” like my public library has — a pile of bins up in the attic that I can easily access to find the book I “know I have somewhere.”

    So browsing my “library” in DL means browsing the WHOLE library — not just the six or eight shelves of books I have out at any given time. You just have to maintain it — put things back in their bin when done, etc. (But if you needed to just re-catalog things, you can borrow a six-year old and give them your barcode scanner.)

    Reply
  9. gkorgeski@mac.com

    I love DL1 and so will probably upgrade. One thing it did for me was to solve the problem of too many books (or not enough library shelves?) I buy a few hundred books a year, as does my wife — so we need an actual library building to contain them all. That, or use DL.

    I buy cheap plastic bins at office supply stores, and use them for book storage. I go through the shelves and grab anything I don’t think I’m going to read or to need sometime soon (e.g. within a few months.) I toss these into one of the bins (I even keep a “collecting bin” under my desk, for later cataloging in DL) All I do is enter a bunch of these at a time into DL, toss them into a bin, number the bin and then log that number into the DL database for all the books at once. This gives me a set of “stacks” like my public library has — a pile of bins up in the attic that I can easily access to find the book I “know I have somewhere.”

    So browsing my “library” in DL means browsing the WHOLE library — not just the six or eight shelves of books I have out at any given time. You just have to maintain it — put things back in their bin when done, etc. (But if you needed to just re-catalog things, you can borrow a six-year old and give them your barcode scanner.)

    Reply
  10. gkorgeski@mac.com

    I love DL1 and so will probably upgrade. One thing it did for me was to solve the problem of too many books (or not enough library shelves?) I buy a few hundred books a year, as does my wife — so we need an actual library building to contain them all. That, or use DL.

    I buy cheap plastic bins at office supply stores, and use them for book storage. I go through the shelves and grab anything I don’t think I’m going to read or to need sometime soon (e.g. within a few months.) I toss these into one of the bins (I even keep a “collecting bin” under my desk, for later cataloging in DL) All I do is enter a bunch of these at a time into DL, toss them into a bin, number the bin and then log that number into the DL database for all the books at once. This gives me a set of “stacks” like my public library has — a pile of bins up in the attic that I can easily access to find the book I “know I have somewhere.”

    So browsing my “library” in DL means browsing the WHOLE library — not just the six or eight shelves of books I have out at any given time. You just have to maintain it — put things back in their bin when done, etc. (But if you needed to just re-catalog things, you can borrow a six-year old and give them your barcode scanner.)

    Reply
  11. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    “as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it)” – Max
    Actually both DL1 and DL2 have the ability to catalogue non-R1 DVD’s and books, etc. Just go into the preferences and select Amazon UK, Amazon Germany, Amazon France, Amazon China or Amazon Japan to get your different regional information.

    As much as I like DL1 and 2 they are missing a few features that I think are essential, or at least, very handy. They do not have a play count so I can keep track of which of my DVD’s or CD’s are getting neglected. There seems to be no way to get a summary of the total dollars expended for each type of media (that is very scary but also useful!) DL doesn’t access Gracenotes for CD information or allmusic.com for reviews so you only get the very short Amazon reviews and Amazon has a more limited selection CD’s than Gracenotes or allmusic.com. Amazon also has a tendency to add tons of useless categories, such as categorizing a move as “divers”, whatever that is, rather than murder/mystery or action.

    Reply
  12. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    “as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it)” – Max
    Actually both DL1 and DL2 have the ability to catalogue non-R1 DVD’s and books, etc. Just go into the preferences and select Amazon UK, Amazon Germany, Amazon France, Amazon China or Amazon Japan to get your different regional information.

    As much as I like DL1 and 2 they are missing a few features that I think are essential, or at least, very handy. They do not have a play count so I can keep track of which of my DVD’s or CD’s are getting neglected. There seems to be no way to get a summary of the total dollars expended for each type of media (that is very scary but also useful!) DL doesn’t access Gracenotes for CD information or allmusic.com for reviews so you only get the very short Amazon reviews and Amazon has a more limited selection CD’s than Gracenotes or allmusic.com. Amazon also has a tendency to add tons of useless categories, such as categorizing a move as “divers”, whatever that is, rather than murder/mystery or action.

    Reply
  13. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    “as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it)” – Max
    Actually both DL1 and DL2 have the ability to catalogue non-R1 DVD’s and books, etc. Just go into the preferences and select Amazon UK, Amazon Germany, Amazon France, Amazon China or Amazon Japan to get your different regional information.

    As much as I like DL1 and 2 they are missing a few features that I think are essential, or at least, very handy. They do not have a play count so I can keep track of which of my DVD’s or CD’s are getting neglected. There seems to be no way to get a summary of the total dollars expended for each type of media (that is very scary but also useful!) DL doesn’t access Gracenotes for CD information or allmusic.com for reviews so you only get the very short Amazon reviews and Amazon has a more limited selection CD’s than Gracenotes or allmusic.com. Amazon also has a tendency to add tons of useless categories, such as categorizing a move as “divers”, whatever that is, rather than murder/mystery or action.

    Reply
  14. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    “as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it)” – Max
    Actually both DL1 and DL2 have the ability to catalogue non-R1 DVD’s and books, etc. Just go into the preferences and select Amazon UK, Amazon Germany, Amazon France, Amazon China or Amazon Japan to get your different regional information.

    As much as I like DL1 and 2 they are missing a few features that I think are essential, or at least, very handy. They do not have a play count so I can keep track of which of my DVD’s or CD’s are getting neglected. There seems to be no way to get a summary of the total dollars expended for each type of media (that is very scary but also useful!) DL doesn’t access Gracenotes for CD information or allmusic.com for reviews so you only get the very short Amazon reviews and Amazon has a more limited selection CD’s than Gracenotes or allmusic.com. Amazon also has a tendency to add tons of useless categories, such as categorizing a move as “divers”, whatever that is, rather than murder/mystery or action.

    Reply
  15. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    “as I’m not in the US I had to find the majority of the 250ish DVDs I put in there manually (<- if they’re not R1 forget it)” – Max
    Actually both DL1 and DL2 have the ability to catalogue non-R1 DVD’s and books, etc. Just go into the preferences and select Amazon UK, Amazon Germany, Amazon France, Amazon China or Amazon Japan to get your different regional information.

    As much as I like DL1 and 2 they are missing a few features that I think are essential, or at least, very handy. They do not have a play count so I can keep track of which of my DVD’s or CD’s are getting neglected. There seems to be no way to get a summary of the total dollars expended for each type of media (that is very scary but also useful!) DL doesn’t access Gracenotes for CD information or allmusic.com for reviews so you only get the very short Amazon reviews and Amazon has a more limited selection CD’s than Gracenotes or allmusic.com. Amazon also has a tendency to add tons of useless categories, such as categorizing a move as “divers”, whatever that is, rather than murder/mystery or action.

    Reply
  16. micksanders@mac.com

    Further to Jim’s comments:

    (1) DL2 will automatically search all the Amazon stores mentioned, even without setting a preference (which may change the search order), however…
    (2) None of these Amazon stores contain (with rare exceptions) the barcodes for Australia/New Zealand or SE Asian DVDs. I tried a random sample of Region 4 and Singapore DVDs, and none could be matched.

    I bought DL2 based on numerous recommendations (but obviously without doing my research). Because it appears to be *wholly* based on Amazon stores, non-book items are problematic outside North America, Europe, Japan, etc. What is equally annoying is the refusal of Delicious Monster to even reply to my formal support requests regarding this.

    My summary: largely worthless unless you have an Amazon store in your country.

    Reply
  17. micksanders@mac.com

    Further to Jim’s comments:

    (1) DL2 will automatically search all the Amazon stores mentioned, even without setting a preference (which may change the search order), however…
    (2) None of these Amazon stores contain (with rare exceptions) the barcodes for Australia/New Zealand or SE Asian DVDs. I tried a random sample of Region 4 and Singapore DVDs, and none could be matched.

    I bought DL2 based on numerous recommendations (but obviously without doing my research). Because it appears to be *wholly* based on Amazon stores, non-book items are problematic outside North America, Europe, Japan, etc. What is equally annoying is the refusal of Delicious Monster to even reply to my formal support requests regarding this.

    My summary: largely worthless unless you have an Amazon store in your country.

    Reply
  18. micksanders@mac.com

    Further to Jim’s comments:

    (1) DL2 will automatically search all the Amazon stores mentioned, even without setting a preference (which may change the search order), however…
    (2) None of these Amazon stores contain (with rare exceptions) the barcodes for Australia/New Zealand or SE Asian DVDs. I tried a random sample of Region 4 and Singapore DVDs, and none could be matched.

    I bought DL2 based on numerous recommendations (but obviously without doing my research). Because it appears to be *wholly* based on Amazon stores, non-book items are problematic outside North America, Europe, Japan, etc. What is equally annoying is the refusal of Delicious Monster to even reply to my formal support requests regarding this.

    My summary: largely worthless unless you have an Amazon store in your country.

    Reply
  19. micksanders@mac.com

    Further to Jim’s comments:

    (1) DL2 will automatically search all the Amazon stores mentioned, even without setting a preference (which may change the search order), however…
    (2) None of these Amazon stores contain (with rare exceptions) the barcodes for Australia/New Zealand or SE Asian DVDs. I tried a random sample of Region 4 and Singapore DVDs, and none could be matched.

    I bought DL2 based on numerous recommendations (but obviously without doing my research). Because it appears to be *wholly* based on Amazon stores, non-book items are problematic outside North America, Europe, Japan, etc. What is equally annoying is the refusal of Delicious Monster to even reply to my formal support requests regarding this.

    My summary: largely worthless unless you have an Amazon store in your country.

    Reply
  20. micksanders@mac.com

    Further to Jim’s comments:

    (1) DL2 will automatically search all the Amazon stores mentioned, even without setting a preference (which may change the search order), however…
    (2) None of these Amazon stores contain (with rare exceptions) the barcodes for Australia/New Zealand or SE Asian DVDs. I tried a random sample of Region 4 and Singapore DVDs, and none could be matched.

    I bought DL2 based on numerous recommendations (but obviously without doing my research). Because it appears to be *wholly* based on Amazon stores, non-book items are problematic outside North America, Europe, Japan, etc. What is equally annoying is the refusal of Delicious Monster to even reply to my formal support requests regarding this.

    My summary: largely worthless unless you have an Amazon store in your country.

    Reply
  21. iain.triffitt@gmail.com

    I’ve been using dvdpedia for a while now and wanted to see if Delicious Library improved on the experience.

    While it looks nice, the bulk of my collection is region 4 or 3 (as I live in Australia) and DL2 is so closely allied with Amazon as to be useless. Dvdpedia can interrogate yesasia and ezydvd and (most importantly) the IMDB. It’s not as pretty as DL2, but it’s far more useful for my purposes. DL2 appears to me to more useful to Amazon than the consumer but YMMV.

    Reply
  22. iain.triffitt@gmail.com

    I’ve been using dvdpedia for a while now and wanted to see if Delicious Library improved on the experience.

    While it looks nice, the bulk of my collection is region 4 or 3 (as I live in Australia) and DL2 is so closely allied with Amazon as to be useless. Dvdpedia can interrogate yesasia and ezydvd and (most importantly) the IMDB. It’s not as pretty as DL2, but it’s far more useful for my purposes. DL2 appears to me to more useful to Amazon than the consumer but YMMV.

    Reply
  23. iain.triffitt@gmail.com

    I’ve been using dvdpedia for a while now and wanted to see if Delicious Library improved on the experience.

    While it looks nice, the bulk of my collection is region 4 or 3 (as I live in Australia) and DL2 is so closely allied with Amazon as to be useless. Dvdpedia can interrogate yesasia and ezydvd and (most importantly) the IMDB. It’s not as pretty as DL2, but it’s far more useful for my purposes. DL2 appears to me to more useful to Amazon than the consumer but YMMV.

    Reply
  24. iain.triffitt@gmail.com

    I’ve been using dvdpedia for a while now and wanted to see if Delicious Library improved on the experience.

    While it looks nice, the bulk of my collection is region 4 or 3 (as I live in Australia) and DL2 is so closely allied with Amazon as to be useless. Dvdpedia can interrogate yesasia and ezydvd and (most importantly) the IMDB. It’s not as pretty as DL2, but it’s far more useful for my purposes. DL2 appears to me to more useful to Amazon than the consumer but YMMV.

    Reply
  25. iain.triffitt@gmail.com

    I’ve been using dvdpedia for a while now and wanted to see if Delicious Library improved on the experience.

    While it looks nice, the bulk of my collection is region 4 or 3 (as I live in Australia) and DL2 is so closely allied with Amazon as to be useless. Dvdpedia can interrogate yesasia and ezydvd and (most importantly) the IMDB. It’s not as pretty as DL2, but it’s far more useful for my purposes. DL2 appears to me to more useful to Amazon than the consumer but YMMV.

    Reply
  26. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve received several emails and comments now that using Delicious Library in a non-amazon friendly market isn’t all that warm and fuzzy. Make sure you download a trial and kick the tires a bit before buying.

    Reply
  27. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve received several emails and comments now that using Delicious Library in a non-amazon friendly market isn’t all that warm and fuzzy. Make sure you download a trial and kick the tires a bit before buying.

    Reply
  28. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve received several emails and comments now that using Delicious Library in a non-amazon friendly market isn’t all that warm and fuzzy. Make sure you download a trial and kick the tires a bit before buying.

    Reply
  29. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve received several emails and comments now that using Delicious Library in a non-amazon friendly market isn’t all that warm and fuzzy. Make sure you download a trial and kick the tires a bit before buying.

    Reply
  30. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve received several emails and comments now that using Delicious Library in a non-amazon friendly market isn’t all that warm and fuzzy. Make sure you download a trial and kick the tires a bit before buying.

    Reply
  31. macsparky@macsparky.exjay.com

    according to the pre-release reviews around the web, DL2 was supposed to be great and was supposed to be released near the end of 2007. boy, was i looking forward to that. but the delicious monster folks kept pushing that date out, until it was finally released in june or so of 2008.

    i downloaded the initial DL2 release, ran it, and put it through its paces. i did not buy it at that time, but it certainly did not live up to the hype. i opened four bug reports, all of which were eventually closed with no explanation or documented resolution, and no feedback to me. (well, that’s a lie, the support guy smugly told me he’d gladly refund my money if i showed him my receipt. he didn’t address any of the reported problems, but i thought it was nice he had the time to be sarcastic.)

    i waited until a maintenance release was available and then bought it. some of the same problems were still there, along with at least one new major problem (major to me anyway – it couldn’t find my itunes library). i opened another bug report. six weeks later and zero feedback again and i took them up on their refund offer. i’ve been told my money would be refunded; i guess we’ll see how that works out.

    i tried very hard to love this product. like mick before me, it’s incredibly annoying to me that they provide zero feedback to their customers. in the end, what it seems to be is that their customers pay forty bucks for the privilege of beta testing delicious monster’s software. in my opinion, these guys have no business being in business. the software should be shareware at best. caveat emptor.

    Reply
  32. macsparky@macsparky.exjay.com

    according to the pre-release reviews around the web, DL2 was supposed to be great and was supposed to be released near the end of 2007. boy, was i looking forward to that. but the delicious monster folks kept pushing that date out, until it was finally released in june or so of 2008.

    i downloaded the initial DL2 release, ran it, and put it through its paces. i did not buy it at that time, but it certainly did not live up to the hype. i opened four bug reports, all of which were eventually closed with no explanation or documented resolution, and no feedback to me. (well, that’s a lie, the support guy smugly told me he’d gladly refund my money if i showed him my receipt. he didn’t address any of the reported problems, but i thought it was nice he had the time to be sarcastic.)

    i waited until a maintenance release was available and then bought it. some of the same problems were still there, along with at least one new major problem (major to me anyway – it couldn’t find my itunes library). i opened another bug report. six weeks later and zero feedback again and i took them up on their refund offer. i’ve been told my money would be refunded; i guess we’ll see how that works out.

    i tried very hard to love this product. like mick before me, it’s incredibly annoying to me that they provide zero feedback to their customers. in the end, what it seems to be is that their customers pay forty bucks for the privilege of beta testing delicious monster’s software. in my opinion, these guys have no business being in business. the software should be shareware at best. caveat emptor.

    Reply
  33. macsparky@macsparky.exjay.com

    according to the pre-release reviews around the web, DL2 was supposed to be great and was supposed to be released near the end of 2007. boy, was i looking forward to that. but the delicious monster folks kept pushing that date out, until it was finally released in june or so of 2008.

    i downloaded the initial DL2 release, ran it, and put it through its paces. i did not buy it at that time, but it certainly did not live up to the hype. i opened four bug reports, all of which were eventually closed with no explanation or documented resolution, and no feedback to me. (well, that’s a lie, the support guy smugly told me he’d gladly refund my money if i showed him my receipt. he didn’t address any of the reported problems, but i thought it was nice he had the time to be sarcastic.)

    i waited until a maintenance release was available and then bought it. some of the same problems were still there, along with at least one new major problem (major to me anyway – it couldn’t find my itunes library). i opened another bug report. six weeks later and zero feedback again and i took them up on their refund offer. i’ve been told my money would be refunded; i guess we’ll see how that works out.

    i tried very hard to love this product. like mick before me, it’s incredibly annoying to me that they provide zero feedback to their customers. in the end, what it seems to be is that their customers pay forty bucks for the privilege of beta testing delicious monster’s software. in my opinion, these guys have no business being in business. the software should be shareware at best. caveat emptor.

    Reply
  34. macsparky@macsparky.exjay.com

    according to the pre-release reviews around the web, DL2 was supposed to be great and was supposed to be released near the end of 2007. boy, was i looking forward to that. but the delicious monster folks kept pushing that date out, until it was finally released in june or so of 2008.

    i downloaded the initial DL2 release, ran it, and put it through its paces. i did not buy it at that time, but it certainly did not live up to the hype. i opened four bug reports, all of which were eventually closed with no explanation or documented resolution, and no feedback to me. (well, that’s a lie, the support guy smugly told me he’d gladly refund my money if i showed him my receipt. he didn’t address any of the reported problems, but i thought it was nice he had the time to be sarcastic.)

    i waited until a maintenance release was available and then bought it. some of the same problems were still there, along with at least one new major problem (major to me anyway – it couldn’t find my itunes library). i opened another bug report. six weeks later and zero feedback again and i took them up on their refund offer. i’ve been told my money would be refunded; i guess we’ll see how that works out.

    i tried very hard to love this product. like mick before me, it’s incredibly annoying to me that they provide zero feedback to their customers. in the end, what it seems to be is that their customers pay forty bucks for the privilege of beta testing delicious monster’s software. in my opinion, these guys have no business being in business. the software should be shareware at best. caveat emptor.

    Reply
  35. macsparky@macsparky.exjay.com

    according to the pre-release reviews around the web, DL2 was supposed to be great and was supposed to be released near the end of 2007. boy, was i looking forward to that. but the delicious monster folks kept pushing that date out, until it was finally released in june or so of 2008.

    i downloaded the initial DL2 release, ran it, and put it through its paces. i did not buy it at that time, but it certainly did not live up to the hype. i opened four bug reports, all of which were eventually closed with no explanation or documented resolution, and no feedback to me. (well, that’s a lie, the support guy smugly told me he’d gladly refund my money if i showed him my receipt. he didn’t address any of the reported problems, but i thought it was nice he had the time to be sarcastic.)

    i waited until a maintenance release was available and then bought it. some of the same problems were still there, along with at least one new major problem (major to me anyway – it couldn’t find my itunes library). i opened another bug report. six weeks later and zero feedback again and i took them up on their refund offer. i’ve been told my money would be refunded; i guess we’ll see how that works out.

    i tried very hard to love this product. like mick before me, it’s incredibly annoying to me that they provide zero feedback to their customers. in the end, what it seems to be is that their customers pay forty bucks for the privilege of beta testing delicious monster’s software. in my opinion, these guys have no business being in business. the software should be shareware at best. caveat emptor.

    Reply
  36. kayodes@gmail.com

    True it’s eye candy but the most perplexing thing to me is the fact that I cannot play back my cataloged DVD/movie as their is no way to link the cataloged movie to a file on my mac (unless I’m missing something). Because of this I definitely prefer DVDpedia which also has a nice plug-in for Front Row.

    Reply
  37. kayodes@gmail.com

    True it’s eye candy but the most perplexing thing to me is the fact that I cannot play back my cataloged DVD/movie as their is no way to link the cataloged movie to a file on my mac (unless I’m missing something). Because of this I definitely prefer DVDpedia which also has a nice plug-in for Front Row.

    Reply
  38. kayodes@gmail.com

    True it’s eye candy but the most perplexing thing to me is the fact that I cannot play back my cataloged DVD/movie as their is no way to link the cataloged movie to a file on my mac (unless I’m missing something). Because of this I definitely prefer DVDpedia which also has a nice plug-in for Front Row.

    Reply
  39. kayodes@gmail.com

    True it’s eye candy but the most perplexing thing to me is the fact that I cannot play back my cataloged DVD/movie as their is no way to link the cataloged movie to a file on my mac (unless I’m missing something). Because of this I definitely prefer DVDpedia which also has a nice plug-in for Front Row.

    Reply
  40. kayodes@gmail.com

    True it’s eye candy but the most perplexing thing to me is the fact that I cannot play back my cataloged DVD/movie as their is no way to link the cataloged movie to a file on my mac (unless I’m missing something). Because of this I definitely prefer DVDpedia which also has a nice plug-in for Front Row.

    Reply
  41. jcoberkrom@yahoo.com

    I love this software! Yeah I'm one of those guys that likes to have lists of everything. However, it doesn't let me sort music by artist! If ya can and I missed it, it means the developers need to rethink how they allow one to do this. Also, I'm missing the attraction of being able to "Publish"
    But ultimately it's the price. This is for all practicable purpose "entertainment" software and really not something I'd want to spend more then $19.99 on!

    Reply
  42. jcoberkrom@yahoo.com

    I love this software! Yeah I'm one of those guys that likes to have lists of everything. However, it doesn't let me sort music by artist! If ya can and I missed it, it means the developers need to rethink how they allow one to do this. Also, I'm missing the attraction of being able to "Publish"
    But ultimately it's the price. This is for all practicable purpose "entertainment" software and really not something I'd want to spend more then $19.99 on!

    Reply
  43. jcoberkrom@yahoo.com

    I love this software! Yeah I'm one of those guys that likes to have lists of everything. However, it doesn't let me sort music by artist! If ya can and I missed it, it means the developers need to rethink how they allow one to do this. Also, I'm missing the attraction of being able to "Publish"
    But ultimately it's the price. This is for all practicable purpose "entertainment" software and really not something I'd want to spend more then $19.99 on!

    Reply
  44. jcoberkrom@yahoo.com

    I love this software! Yeah I'm one of those guys that likes to have lists of everything. However, it doesn't let me sort music by artist! If ya can and I missed it, it means the developers need to rethink how they allow one to do this. Also, I'm missing the attraction of being able to "Publish"
    But ultimately it's the price. This is for all practicable purpose "entertainment" software and really not something I'd want to spend more then $19.99 on!

    Reply
  45. jcoberkrom@yahoo.com

    I love this software! Yeah I'm one of those guys that likes to have lists of everything. However, it doesn't let me sort music by artist! If ya can and I missed it, it means the developers need to rethink how they allow one to do this. Also, I'm missing the attraction of being able to "Publish"
    But ultimately it's the price. This is for all practicable purpose "entertainment" software and really not something I'd want to spend more then $19.99 on!

    Reply
  46. nberman1@me.com

    Its a nice idea but it is not ready for prime time. Mine crashed after inputting over 400 books. One response from support a few days ago. Since then nothing. Apple tried to help but exhausted its ability. Suggested contacting the manufacturer. Been there. No one home. Program continues to crash. Useless.

    Reply
  47. nberman1@me.com

    Its a nice idea but it is not ready for prime time. Mine crashed after inputting over 400 books. One response from support a few days ago. Since then nothing. Apple tried to help but exhausted its ability. Suggested contacting the manufacturer. Been there. No one home. Program continues to crash. Useless.

    Reply
  48. nberman1@me.com

    Its a nice idea but it is not ready for prime time. Mine crashed after inputting over 400 books. One response from support a few days ago. Since then nothing. Apple tried to help but exhausted its ability. Suggested contacting the manufacturer. Been there. No one home. Program continues to crash. Useless.

    Reply
  49. nberman1@me.com

    Its a nice idea but it is not ready for prime time. Mine crashed after inputting over 400 books. One response from support a few days ago. Since then nothing. Apple tried to help but exhausted its ability. Suggested contacting the manufacturer. Been there. No one home. Program continues to crash. Useless.

    Reply
  50. nberman1@me.com

    Its a nice idea but it is not ready for prime time. Mine crashed after inputting over 400 books. One response from support a few days ago. Since then nothing. Apple tried to help but exhausted its ability. Suggested contacting the manufacturer. Been there. No one home. Program continues to crash. Useless.

    Reply

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