Dear Steve, Get Well Soon

Today Steve Jobs announced he’ll be taking a leave of absence until June while he recovers from his illness. He didn’t elaborate on precisely what is wrong he did explain his problems are, “more complex than he thought.” I hope it is not too serious. There are some very smart people at Apple and I have no doubt the company can continue to innovate in his absence. Hopefully Steve can get some rest and return full of new ideas in the Summer.

10 Comments Dear Steve, Get Well Soon

  1. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I second David in wishing Steve Jobs a speedy and complete recovery from his illness. The way some of the press, particularly the financial press, has handled this executive’s illness rubs me the wrong way. While there is no downplaying that Steve Jobs is a brilliant visionary and the prototype key person, much of what has been written gives the impression that Apple would collapse as fast as the Tower of Mordor upon the destruction of the Ring if anything happened to its CEO. That proposition dismisses irrationally the talent and ability of the thousands of smart people at work at the company, not to mention its wildly successful product line and marketing channels. Moreover, presuming to hang so much of the stock value of such a large public company around one person’s neck has undoubtedly put a lot more stress on Steve Jobs and his family than is decent even for a high profile public figure such as he is. I am a shareholder and I take no joy when the stock value declines but I am glad that Steve Jobs is doing what is best for his health. After all, how could I reasonably have any complaint with him: he has given his all to this company and I have benefited both as a consumer of Apple’s great products and as an investor. To ask anymore of Steve Jobs would, in my opinion, be pretty damn greedy.

    Reply
  2. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I second David in wishing Steve Jobs a speedy and complete recovery from his illness. The way some of the press, particularly the financial press, has handled this executive’s illness rubs me the wrong way. While there is no downplaying that Steve Jobs is a brilliant visionary and the prototype key person, much of what has been written gives the impression that Apple would collapse as fast as the Tower of Mordor upon the destruction of the Ring if anything happened to its CEO. That proposition dismisses irrationally the talent and ability of the thousands of smart people at work at the company, not to mention its wildly successful product line and marketing channels. Moreover, presuming to hang so much of the stock value of such a large public company around one person’s neck has undoubtedly put a lot more stress on Steve Jobs and his family than is decent even for a high profile public figure such as he is. I am a shareholder and I take no joy when the stock value declines but I am glad that Steve Jobs is doing what is best for his health. After all, how could I reasonably have any complaint with him: he has given his all to this company and I have benefited both as a consumer of Apple’s great products and as an investor. To ask anymore of Steve Jobs would, in my opinion, be pretty damn greedy.

    Reply
  3. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I second David in wishing Steve Jobs a speedy and complete recovery from his illness. The way some of the press, particularly the financial press, has handled this executive’s illness rubs me the wrong way. While there is no downplaying that Steve Jobs is a brilliant visionary and the prototype key person, much of what has been written gives the impression that Apple would collapse as fast as the Tower of Mordor upon the destruction of the Ring if anything happened to its CEO. That proposition dismisses irrationally the talent and ability of the thousands of smart people at work at the company, not to mention its wildly successful product line and marketing channels. Moreover, presuming to hang so much of the stock value of such a large public company around one person’s neck has undoubtedly put a lot more stress on Steve Jobs and his family than is decent even for a high profile public figure such as he is. I am a shareholder and I take no joy when the stock value declines but I am glad that Steve Jobs is doing what is best for his health. After all, how could I reasonably have any complaint with him: he has given his all to this company and I have benefited both as a consumer of Apple’s great products and as an investor. To ask anymore of Steve Jobs would, in my opinion, be pretty damn greedy.

    Reply
  4. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I second David in wishing Steve Jobs a speedy and complete recovery from his illness. The way some of the press, particularly the financial press, has handled this executive’s illness rubs me the wrong way. While there is no downplaying that Steve Jobs is a brilliant visionary and the prototype key person, much of what has been written gives the impression that Apple would collapse as fast as the Tower of Mordor upon the destruction of the Ring if anything happened to its CEO. That proposition dismisses irrationally the talent and ability of the thousands of smart people at work at the company, not to mention its wildly successful product line and marketing channels. Moreover, presuming to hang so much of the stock value of such a large public company around one person’s neck has undoubtedly put a lot more stress on Steve Jobs and his family than is decent even for a high profile public figure such as he is. I am a shareholder and I take no joy when the stock value declines but I am glad that Steve Jobs is doing what is best for his health. After all, how could I reasonably have any complaint with him: he has given his all to this company and I have benefited both as a consumer of Apple’s great products and as an investor. To ask anymore of Steve Jobs would, in my opinion, be pretty damn greedy.

    Reply
  5. anthonyjross@mac.com

    I second David in wishing Steve Jobs a speedy and complete recovery from his illness. The way some of the press, particularly the financial press, has handled this executive’s illness rubs me the wrong way. While there is no downplaying that Steve Jobs is a brilliant visionary and the prototype key person, much of what has been written gives the impression that Apple would collapse as fast as the Tower of Mordor upon the destruction of the Ring if anything happened to its CEO. That proposition dismisses irrationally the talent and ability of the thousands of smart people at work at the company, not to mention its wildly successful product line and marketing channels. Moreover, presuming to hang so much of the stock value of such a large public company around one person’s neck has undoubtedly put a lot more stress on Steve Jobs and his family than is decent even for a high profile public figure such as he is. I am a shareholder and I take no joy when the stock value declines but I am glad that Steve Jobs is doing what is best for his health. After all, how could I reasonably have any complaint with him: he has given his all to this company and I have benefited both as a consumer of Apple’s great products and as an investor. To ask anymore of Steve Jobs would, in my opinion, be pretty damn greedy.

    Reply

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