The Netbook Experiment

os-x-on-dell-inspiron-mini-9.jpg.jpeg

This week I had the opportunity to spend a few days driving a Dell Mini 9 OS X enabled netbook. For the uninitiated, Netbooks are those tiny computers you see people pull out of their pockets in airports and places that sale lots of expensive coffee. Like the MacBook Air, these computers give up power for portability. Unlike the MacBook Air, these computers focus on small footprint over the Air’s emphasis on thin.

Anyway, although you are not supposed to be able to run OS X on one, hackers have been doing it for awhile. There are plenty of online tutorials explaining how to do this and some enterprising folks are selling them online. So I was loaned a Dell Mini 9 and gave it a try. I really did.

Dell Mini 9.jpg

The netbook phenomena is all about compromises. That starts with computing power. Most of them are based on the single core Intel Atom processor. This is fine for web browsing, e-mail, and word processing, but that is about it.

dell keyboard.jpg

Additionally the footprint is so small that the manufacturers are required to scrunch the keyboard together. In the case of the Dell Mini 9, the keyboard is quite small. Typing on it, I experienced a noticeable slow down in typing speed and accuracy hit. More importantly, after using it for 45 minutes, I felt my hands cramping. There is a reason the only person pictured typing on one of these at Dell’s site looks to be about ten years old.

kid with dell.jpg

The screen was equally inadequate. The backlight was nothing close to the LED screen on my MacBook Air. Likewise the screen resolution of 1024 x 600 runs out of pixels very quickly.

The build quality was also unsatisfactory. The plastic case was hardly rigid and the battery actually wiggled when I carried it.

Of course there were some good points about the Dell. It was my first experience with loading an OS from an SSD drive and I liked it. The read speeds were faster than my existing hard drive while the write speeds were a bit slower. The battery life was excellent and the variety of ports and connectors was nice.

This post ignores the question of whether it is legal to run OS X on non-Apple hardware. Apple certainly doesn’t think so. Either way, I wouldn’t be surprised if you found upgrading these OS X netbooks to include additional steps and headaches.

Steve Jobs explained that Apple hasn’t entered the netbook space because it refuses to make a computer that is “a piece of junk.” Honestly, that was my impression of the Dell Mini 9. The small keyboard and screen got in the way of any productive computing. It isn’t that much more money to just buy the low end MacBook or, if your budget is tight, a used MacBook. If you’ve already got a nice MacBook, I’d suggest that rather than buying an inadequate netbook, getting a theft and damage insurance policy on your existing Mac so you aren’t so afraid to carry it around. I have one on my MacBook Air that costs me $100 a year and gets me a full replacement in the event of a catastrphe.

For the record, I get the point of netbooks. I understand they are not supposed to be the best computers. They are just supposed to be cheap and small and (for lack of a better term) disposable. I also get that it is entirely unfair to compare a Dell Mini 9 to an Apple laptop that is (at least) twice the cost. I know several Mac geeks and road warrior types who love their netbooks but in the end, I want no part of it. I think Apple will eventually get into the space but from an entirely different angle. Hopefully a tablet with a bluetooth keyboard. We’ll see.

245 Comments The Netbook Experiment

  1. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Hi David,

    Good write up. But your closing point is somewhat understated. A netbook can be one third the price of a mac laptop.

    And the point you made about them being suitable for web browsing, email, and word processing “and that’s about it”. You’re right, but for the vast majority of non-enterprise users, this is all that they need.

    For many, esp. in these economically challenging times, a netbook might well be the ONLY alternative to NO computer. So I think they’re a good thing. If you need more, buy more. More options for consumers are BETTER, no?

    Best Rgds
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  2. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Hi David,

    Good write up. But your closing point is somewhat understated. A netbook can be one third the price of a mac laptop.

    And the point you made about them being suitable for web browsing, email, and word processing “and that’s about it”. You’re right, but for the vast majority of non-enterprise users, this is all that they need.

    For many, esp. in these economically challenging times, a netbook might well be the ONLY alternative to NO computer. So I think they’re a good thing. If you need more, buy more. More options for consumers are BETTER, no?

    Best Rgds
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  3. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Hi David,

    Good write up. But your closing point is somewhat understated. A netbook can be one third the price of a mac laptop.

    And the point you made about them being suitable for web browsing, email, and word processing “and that’s about it”. You’re right, but for the vast majority of non-enterprise users, this is all that they need.

    For many, esp. in these economically challenging times, a netbook might well be the ONLY alternative to NO computer. So I think they’re a good thing. If you need more, buy more. More options for consumers are BETTER, no?

    Best Rgds
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  4. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Hi David,

    Good write up. But your closing point is somewhat understated. A netbook can be one third the price of a mac laptop.

    And the point you made about them being suitable for web browsing, email, and word processing “and that’s about it”. You’re right, but for the vast majority of non-enterprise users, this is all that they need.

    For many, esp. in these economically challenging times, a netbook might well be the ONLY alternative to NO computer. So I think they’re a good thing. If you need more, buy more. More options for consumers are BETTER, no?

    Best Rgds
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  5. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Hi David,

    Good write up. But your closing point is somewhat understated. A netbook can be one third the price of a mac laptop.

    And the point you made about them being suitable for web browsing, email, and word processing “and that’s about it”. You’re right, but for the vast majority of non-enterprise users, this is all that they need.

    For many, esp. in these economically challenging times, a netbook might well be the ONLY alternative to NO computer. So I think they’re a good thing. If you need more, buy more. More options for consumers are BETTER, no?

    Best Rgds
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  6. toddsmail2@gmail.com

    Thanks for the review. My mother-in-law has been considering getting one because all she does is e-mail and very light surfing. However, since she’s as blind as a bat, I’m not sure that the small screen size is what she needs. Sure she could get a larger screen monitor, but by then aren’t you spending the same amount as a real computer? Gonna have to think on this

    Reply
  7. toddsmail2@gmail.com

    Thanks for the review. My mother-in-law has been considering getting one because all she does is e-mail and very light surfing. However, since she’s as blind as a bat, I’m not sure that the small screen size is what she needs. Sure she could get a larger screen monitor, but by then aren’t you spending the same amount as a real computer? Gonna have to think on this

    Reply
  8. toddsmail2@gmail.com

    Thanks for the review. My mother-in-law has been considering getting one because all she does is e-mail and very light surfing. However, since she’s as blind as a bat, I’m not sure that the small screen size is what she needs. Sure she could get a larger screen monitor, but by then aren’t you spending the same amount as a real computer? Gonna have to think on this

    Reply
  9. toddsmail2@gmail.com

    Thanks for the review. My mother-in-law has been considering getting one because all she does is e-mail and very light surfing. However, since she’s as blind as a bat, I’m not sure that the small screen size is what she needs. Sure she could get a larger screen monitor, but by then aren’t you spending the same amount as a real computer? Gonna have to think on this

    Reply
  10. toddsmail2@gmail.com

    Thanks for the review. My mother-in-law has been considering getting one because all she does is e-mail and very light surfing. However, since she’s as blind as a bat, I’m not sure that the small screen size is what she needs. Sure she could get a larger screen monitor, but by then aren’t you spending the same amount as a real computer? Gonna have to think on this

    Reply
  11. tuawsteve@gmail.com

    Hi — After buying a Dell mini 9 for a trip to Africa, I’m selling this netbook. Why? It’s a cheap piece of junk. The screen and keyboard are too small to do any real work on. I have a MacBook Air that’s just as light, has a nice big and bright screen, a standard keyboard that’s a joy to use, and can run OS X, Linux and Windows without a lot of hacking involved.

    Frankly, I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9″ netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook. Many people want one because they’re “so cute”, but I hear the same griping from everyone who has one once they’ve used it for a while.

    Just my 2¢ worth!

    Steve

    Reply
  12. tuawsteve@gmail.com

    Hi — After buying a Dell mini 9 for a trip to Africa, I’m selling this netbook. Why? It’s a cheap piece of junk. The screen and keyboard are too small to do any real work on. I have a MacBook Air that’s just as light, has a nice big and bright screen, a standard keyboard that’s a joy to use, and can run OS X, Linux and Windows without a lot of hacking involved.

    Frankly, I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9″ netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook. Many people want one because they’re “so cute”, but I hear the same griping from everyone who has one once they’ve used it for a while.

    Just my 2¢ worth!

    Steve

    Reply
  13. tuawsteve@gmail.com

    Hi — After buying a Dell mini 9 for a trip to Africa, I’m selling this netbook. Why? It’s a cheap piece of junk. The screen and keyboard are too small to do any real work on. I have a MacBook Air that’s just as light, has a nice big and bright screen, a standard keyboard that’s a joy to use, and can run OS X, Linux and Windows without a lot of hacking involved.

    Frankly, I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9″ netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook. Many people want one because they’re “so cute”, but I hear the same griping from everyone who has one once they’ve used it for a while.

    Just my 2¢ worth!

    Steve

    Reply
  14. tuawsteve@gmail.com

    Hi — After buying a Dell mini 9 for a trip to Africa, I’m selling this netbook. Why? It’s a cheap piece of junk. The screen and keyboard are too small to do any real work on. I have a MacBook Air that’s just as light, has a nice big and bright screen, a standard keyboard that’s a joy to use, and can run OS X, Linux and Windows without a lot of hacking involved.

    Frankly, I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9″ netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook. Many people want one because they’re “so cute”, but I hear the same griping from everyone who has one once they’ve used it for a while.

    Just my 2¢ worth!

    Steve

    Reply
  15. tuawsteve@gmail.com

    Hi — After buying a Dell mini 9 for a trip to Africa, I’m selling this netbook. Why? It’s a cheap piece of junk. The screen and keyboard are too small to do any real work on. I have a MacBook Air that’s just as light, has a nice big and bright screen, a standard keyboard that’s a joy to use, and can run OS X, Linux and Windows without a lot of hacking involved.

    Frankly, I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9″ netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook. Many people want one because they’re “so cute”, but I hear the same griping from everyone who has one once they’ve used it for a while.

    Just my 2¢ worth!

    Steve

    Reply
  16. jameskatt@gmail.com

    Thanks for your review.

    If one can’t afford a Mac, then get a second job or better job. It’s as simple as that.

    Netbooks are pieces of junk. Some people want them but they are highly compromised experiences. They are not things that Apple would produce.

    Apple makes high quality products that people, even in a recession, would buy. Apple doesn’t make “disposable” products. Macs generally are useful for 7 years, much longer than the 2-3 years of the average PC.

    I prefer the capabilities of a MacBook to a netbook. The average Mac user runs several applictions at once – something a netbook can hardly do.

    Again, If you want a Mac and are poor, get a second job or a better job. Get an education so you can get a better job. Get some work ethic going.

    Reply
  17. jameskatt@gmail.com

    Thanks for your review.

    If one can’t afford a Mac, then get a second job or better job. It’s as simple as that.

    Netbooks are pieces of junk. Some people want them but they are highly compromised experiences. They are not things that Apple would produce.

    Apple makes high quality products that people, even in a recession, would buy. Apple doesn’t make “disposable” products. Macs generally are useful for 7 years, much longer than the 2-3 years of the average PC.

    I prefer the capabilities of a MacBook to a netbook. The average Mac user runs several applictions at once – something a netbook can hardly do.

    Again, If you want a Mac and are poor, get a second job or a better job. Get an education so you can get a better job. Get some work ethic going.

    Reply
  18. jameskatt@gmail.com

    Thanks for your review.

    If one can’t afford a Mac, then get a second job or better job. It’s as simple as that.

    Netbooks are pieces of junk. Some people want them but they are highly compromised experiences. They are not things that Apple would produce.

    Apple makes high quality products that people, even in a recession, would buy. Apple doesn’t make “disposable” products. Macs generally are useful for 7 years, much longer than the 2-3 years of the average PC.

    I prefer the capabilities of a MacBook to a netbook. The average Mac user runs several applictions at once – something a netbook can hardly do.

    Again, If you want a Mac and are poor, get a second job or a better job. Get an education so you can get a better job. Get some work ethic going.

    Reply
  19. jameskatt@gmail.com

    Thanks for your review.

    If one can’t afford a Mac, then get a second job or better job. It’s as simple as that.

    Netbooks are pieces of junk. Some people want them but they are highly compromised experiences. They are not things that Apple would produce.

    Apple makes high quality products that people, even in a recession, would buy. Apple doesn’t make “disposable” products. Macs generally are useful for 7 years, much longer than the 2-3 years of the average PC.

    I prefer the capabilities of a MacBook to a netbook. The average Mac user runs several applictions at once – something a netbook can hardly do.

    Again, If you want a Mac and are poor, get a second job or a better job. Get an education so you can get a better job. Get some work ethic going.

    Reply
  20. jameskatt@gmail.com

    Thanks for your review.

    If one can’t afford a Mac, then get a second job or better job. It’s as simple as that.

    Netbooks are pieces of junk. Some people want them but they are highly compromised experiences. They are not things that Apple would produce.

    Apple makes high quality products that people, even in a recession, would buy. Apple doesn’t make “disposable” products. Macs generally are useful for 7 years, much longer than the 2-3 years of the average PC.

    I prefer the capabilities of a MacBook to a netbook. The average Mac user runs several applictions at once – something a netbook can hardly do.

    Again, If you want a Mac and are poor, get a second job or a better job. Get an education so you can get a better job. Get some work ethic going.

    Reply
  21. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    Reply to Ken Lee
    “More options for consumers are BETTER, no?”

    Actually, No! Take a look at the book “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less” by Barry Schwartz. It turns out that having more choice is actually a bad thing. Humans like to have a small handful of distinct choices, anything over that and we start to second guess ourselves and have to do too much research before we make a purchase. Having said that competition usually forces manufacturers to innovate and make better products (there are lots of exceptions to this – just look at how little cars have evolved or cell phones before the iPhone)

    Reply
  22. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    Reply to Ken Lee
    “More options for consumers are BETTER, no?”

    Actually, No! Take a look at the book “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less” by Barry Schwartz. It turns out that having more choice is actually a bad thing. Humans like to have a small handful of distinct choices, anything over that and we start to second guess ourselves and have to do too much research before we make a purchase. Having said that competition usually forces manufacturers to innovate and make better products (there are lots of exceptions to this – just look at how little cars have evolved or cell phones before the iPhone)

    Reply
  23. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    Reply to Ken Lee
    “More options for consumers are BETTER, no?”

    Actually, No! Take a look at the book “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less” by Barry Schwartz. It turns out that having more choice is actually a bad thing. Humans like to have a small handful of distinct choices, anything over that and we start to second guess ourselves and have to do too much research before we make a purchase. Having said that competition usually forces manufacturers to innovate and make better products (there are lots of exceptions to this – just look at how little cars have evolved or cell phones before the iPhone)

    Reply
  24. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    Reply to Ken Lee
    “More options for consumers are BETTER, no?”

    Actually, No! Take a look at the book “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less” by Barry Schwartz. It turns out that having more choice is actually a bad thing. Humans like to have a small handful of distinct choices, anything over that and we start to second guess ourselves and have to do too much research before we make a purchase. Having said that competition usually forces manufacturers to innovate and make better products (there are lots of exceptions to this – just look at how little cars have evolved or cell phones before the iPhone)

    Reply
  25. jimsan@xtra.co.nz

    Reply to Ken Lee
    “More options for consumers are BETTER, no?”

    Actually, No! Take a look at the book “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less” by Barry Schwartz. It turns out that having more choice is actually a bad thing. Humans like to have a small handful of distinct choices, anything over that and we start to second guess ourselves and have to do too much research before we make a purchase. Having said that competition usually forces manufacturers to innovate and make better products (there are lots of exceptions to this – just look at how little cars have evolved or cell phones before the iPhone)

    Reply
  26. gojira@tiac.net

    James… Sheesh, that’s a bit harsh. All the education in the world won’t help when companies aren’t hiring.

    Good article.

    If you can’t afford a NEW Mac, you can always buy a USED Mac. OR buy a refurb unit from Apple, that still carries a warranty.

    A MacBook or MacBook Pro that’s a couple of generations old will cost about half the price of a new machine and still give you a few years of service. Try to find one that still has AppleCare in effect. Try craigslist.org so it’s a LOCAL seller and you can meet them in person.

    For bit of a speed bump, max out the RAM and swap out the hard drive for a faster one when you can.

    Reply
  27. gojira@tiac.net

    James… Sheesh, that’s a bit harsh. All the education in the world won’t help when companies aren’t hiring.

    Good article.

    If you can’t afford a NEW Mac, you can always buy a USED Mac. OR buy a refurb unit from Apple, that still carries a warranty.

    A MacBook or MacBook Pro that’s a couple of generations old will cost about half the price of a new machine and still give you a few years of service. Try to find one that still has AppleCare in effect. Try craigslist.org so it’s a LOCAL seller and you can meet them in person.

    For bit of a speed bump, max out the RAM and swap out the hard drive for a faster one when you can.

    Reply
  28. gojira@tiac.net

    James… Sheesh, that’s a bit harsh. All the education in the world won’t help when companies aren’t hiring.

    Good article.

    If you can’t afford a NEW Mac, you can always buy a USED Mac. OR buy a refurb unit from Apple, that still carries a warranty.

    A MacBook or MacBook Pro that’s a couple of generations old will cost about half the price of a new machine and still give you a few years of service. Try to find one that still has AppleCare in effect. Try craigslist.org so it’s a LOCAL seller and you can meet them in person.

    For bit of a speed bump, max out the RAM and swap out the hard drive for a faster one when you can.

    Reply
  29. gojira@tiac.net

    James… Sheesh, that’s a bit harsh. All the education in the world won’t help when companies aren’t hiring.

    Good article.

    If you can’t afford a NEW Mac, you can always buy a USED Mac. OR buy a refurb unit from Apple, that still carries a warranty.

    A MacBook or MacBook Pro that’s a couple of generations old will cost about half the price of a new machine and still give you a few years of service. Try to find one that still has AppleCare in effect. Try craigslist.org so it’s a LOCAL seller and you can meet them in person.

    For bit of a speed bump, max out the RAM and swap out the hard drive for a faster one when you can.

    Reply
  30. gojira@tiac.net

    James… Sheesh, that’s a bit harsh. All the education in the world won’t help when companies aren’t hiring.

    Good article.

    If you can’t afford a NEW Mac, you can always buy a USED Mac. OR buy a refurb unit from Apple, that still carries a warranty.

    A MacBook or MacBook Pro that’s a couple of generations old will cost about half the price of a new machine and still give you a few years of service. Try to find one that still has AppleCare in effect. Try craigslist.org so it’s a LOCAL seller and you can meet them in person.

    For bit of a speed bump, max out the RAM and swap out the hard drive for a faster one when you can.

    Reply
  31. prompterbob@gmail.com

    I feel like I’m living on another planet because my experience with my Dell Mini 9 “Hackintosh” is so different. I think it’s an incredible little computer. Outside of the too-small keyboard (I find hunt and peck works well), this little marvel does everything I ask of it. It boots like a speed-demon, runs iChat (with video chat from the built in webcam), Skype, Slingbox, DVD images via Video LAN perfectly, stream songs and video via iTunes sharing. I surf with Firfox and effortlessly stream videos from Hulu and YouTube and watch Apple movie trailers with Quick Time Pro. It goes to sleep and wakes up when I ask it. Seems pretty sturdy to me and get about 3 hours on the battery. For the record, I have 2GB RAM and a 32GB SSD. Oh yeah, I even run software updates (cautiously) without a worry because I got the little bugger backed up via SuperDuper and Time Machine. For under $400 I built a little OS X road warrior. I love it!

    Reply
  32. prompterbob@gmail.com

    I feel like I’m living on another planet because my experience with my Dell Mini 9 “Hackintosh” is so different. I think it’s an incredible little computer. Outside of the too-small keyboard (I find hunt and peck works well), this little marvel does everything I ask of it. It boots like a speed-demon, runs iChat (with video chat from the built in webcam), Skype, Slingbox, DVD images via Video LAN perfectly, stream songs and video via iTunes sharing. I surf with Firfox and effortlessly stream videos from Hulu and YouTube and watch Apple movie trailers with Quick Time Pro. It goes to sleep and wakes up when I ask it. Seems pretty sturdy to me and get about 3 hours on the battery. For the record, I have 2GB RAM and a 32GB SSD. Oh yeah, I even run software updates (cautiously) without a worry because I got the little bugger backed up via SuperDuper and Time Machine. For under $400 I built a little OS X road warrior. I love it!

    Reply
  33. prompterbob@gmail.com

    I feel like I’m living on another planet because my experience with my Dell Mini 9 “Hackintosh” is so different. I think it’s an incredible little computer. Outside of the too-small keyboard (I find hunt and peck works well), this little marvel does everything I ask of it. It boots like a speed-demon, runs iChat (with video chat from the built in webcam), Skype, Slingbox, DVD images via Video LAN perfectly, stream songs and video via iTunes sharing. I surf with Firfox and effortlessly stream videos from Hulu and YouTube and watch Apple movie trailers with Quick Time Pro. It goes to sleep and wakes up when I ask it. Seems pretty sturdy to me and get about 3 hours on the battery. For the record, I have 2GB RAM and a 32GB SSD. Oh yeah, I even run software updates (cautiously) without a worry because I got the little bugger backed up via SuperDuper and Time Machine. For under $400 I built a little OS X road warrior. I love it!

    Reply
  34. prompterbob@gmail.com

    I feel like I’m living on another planet because my experience with my Dell Mini 9 “Hackintosh” is so different. I think it’s an incredible little computer. Outside of the too-small keyboard (I find hunt and peck works well), this little marvel does everything I ask of it. It boots like a speed-demon, runs iChat (with video chat from the built in webcam), Skype, Slingbox, DVD images via Video LAN perfectly, stream songs and video via iTunes sharing. I surf with Firfox and effortlessly stream videos from Hulu and YouTube and watch Apple movie trailers with Quick Time Pro. It goes to sleep and wakes up when I ask it. Seems pretty sturdy to me and get about 3 hours on the battery. For the record, I have 2GB RAM and a 32GB SSD. Oh yeah, I even run software updates (cautiously) without a worry because I got the little bugger backed up via SuperDuper and Time Machine. For under $400 I built a little OS X road warrior. I love it!

    Reply
  35. prompterbob@gmail.com

    I feel like I’m living on another planet because my experience with my Dell Mini 9 “Hackintosh” is so different. I think it’s an incredible little computer. Outside of the too-small keyboard (I find hunt and peck works well), this little marvel does everything I ask of it. It boots like a speed-demon, runs iChat (with video chat from the built in webcam), Skype, Slingbox, DVD images via Video LAN perfectly, stream songs and video via iTunes sharing. I surf with Firfox and effortlessly stream videos from Hulu and YouTube and watch Apple movie trailers with Quick Time Pro. It goes to sleep and wakes up when I ask it. Seems pretty sturdy to me and get about 3 hours on the battery. For the record, I have 2GB RAM and a 32GB SSD. Oh yeah, I even run software updates (cautiously) without a worry because I got the little bugger backed up via SuperDuper and Time Machine. For under $400 I built a little OS X road warrior. I love it!

    Reply
  36. chelless@aol.com

    It’s a frustrating piece of junk. In fact, a full-sized PC is a piece of junk. E-mail and web-surfing are beyond text, and if you do either you don’t want to be painfully aware of your limitations to the point where you’re cursing continuously. My feeling is, if you can’t afford a Macbook, new, or refurbished, then you’re not managing your money very well. And if you think a “notebook” is too big or heavy, you’re a lazy-butted wimp.

    Funny how years ago PC fanboys called the original multi-colored iMacs “toys,” but now many of them are throwing away a few hundred on disposable junk.

    Reply
  37. chelless@aol.com

    It’s a frustrating piece of junk. In fact, a full-sized PC is a piece of junk. E-mail and web-surfing are beyond text, and if you do either you don’t want to be painfully aware of your limitations to the point where you’re cursing continuously. My feeling is, if you can’t afford a Macbook, new, or refurbished, then you’re not managing your money very well. And if you think a “notebook” is too big or heavy, you’re a lazy-butted wimp.

    Funny how years ago PC fanboys called the original multi-colored iMacs “toys,” but now many of them are throwing away a few hundred on disposable junk.

    Reply
  38. chelless@aol.com

    It’s a frustrating piece of junk. In fact, a full-sized PC is a piece of junk. E-mail and web-surfing are beyond text, and if you do either you don’t want to be painfully aware of your limitations to the point where you’re cursing continuously. My feeling is, if you can’t afford a Macbook, new, or refurbished, then you’re not managing your money very well. And if you think a “notebook” is too big or heavy, you’re a lazy-butted wimp.

    Funny how years ago PC fanboys called the original multi-colored iMacs “toys,” but now many of them are throwing away a few hundred on disposable junk.

    Reply
  39. chelless@aol.com

    It’s a frustrating piece of junk. In fact, a full-sized PC is a piece of junk. E-mail and web-surfing are beyond text, and if you do either you don’t want to be painfully aware of your limitations to the point where you’re cursing continuously. My feeling is, if you can’t afford a Macbook, new, or refurbished, then you’re not managing your money very well. And if you think a “notebook” is too big or heavy, you’re a lazy-butted wimp.

    Funny how years ago PC fanboys called the original multi-colored iMacs “toys,” but now many of them are throwing away a few hundred on disposable junk.

    Reply
  40. chelless@aol.com

    It’s a frustrating piece of junk. In fact, a full-sized PC is a piece of junk. E-mail and web-surfing are beyond text, and if you do either you don’t want to be painfully aware of your limitations to the point where you’re cursing continuously. My feeling is, if you can’t afford a Macbook, new, or refurbished, then you’re not managing your money very well. And if you think a “notebook” is too big or heavy, you’re a lazy-butted wimp.

    Funny how years ago PC fanboys called the original multi-colored iMacs “toys,” but now many of them are throwing away a few hundred on disposable junk.

    Reply
  41. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Response to Jim S.

    With all due respect to you, and to the guy you quote, I don’t care what he thinks about humans liking to have a handful of choices. I do like having choices, LOTS OF ‘EM, and I possess the intelligence to make them — as do most people.

    You see, its really quite simple. You assess your needs, study all possible solutions to your problems and needs, and build/buy/otherwise acquire the solutions.

    More choices give you more flexibility, and more choices from more sources equals greater competition. You alluded to this in your post, while questioning its inherent truth. its thinking like that the monopolists/duopolists love.

    You don’t like netbooks? Its simple, DON’T BUY ONE. You like Macbooks and think they’re worth the money, then BUY ONE. For what its worth, I don’t own a netbook, and I do own (several) Macbooks. But only because after sifting through dozens of choices, I reached the conclusion about what was right for me.

    Take care,
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  42. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Response to Jim S.

    With all due respect to you, and to the guy you quote, I don’t care what he thinks about humans liking to have a handful of choices. I do like having choices, LOTS OF ‘EM, and I possess the intelligence to make them — as do most people.

    You see, its really quite simple. You assess your needs, study all possible solutions to your problems and needs, and build/buy/otherwise acquire the solutions.

    More choices give you more flexibility, and more choices from more sources equals greater competition. You alluded to this in your post, while questioning its inherent truth. its thinking like that the monopolists/duopolists love.

    You don’t like netbooks? Its simple, DON’T BUY ONE. You like Macbooks and think they’re worth the money, then BUY ONE. For what its worth, I don’t own a netbook, and I do own (several) Macbooks. But only because after sifting through dozens of choices, I reached the conclusion about what was right for me.

    Take care,
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  43. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Response to Jim S.

    With all due respect to you, and to the guy you quote, I don’t care what he thinks about humans liking to have a handful of choices. I do like having choices, LOTS OF ‘EM, and I possess the intelligence to make them — as do most people.

    You see, its really quite simple. You assess your needs, study all possible solutions to your problems and needs, and build/buy/otherwise acquire the solutions.

    More choices give you more flexibility, and more choices from more sources equals greater competition. You alluded to this in your post, while questioning its inherent truth. its thinking like that the monopolists/duopolists love.

    You don’t like netbooks? Its simple, DON’T BUY ONE. You like Macbooks and think they’re worth the money, then BUY ONE. For what its worth, I don’t own a netbook, and I do own (several) Macbooks. But only because after sifting through dozens of choices, I reached the conclusion about what was right for me.

    Take care,
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  44. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Response to Jim S.

    With all due respect to you, and to the guy you quote, I don’t care what he thinks about humans liking to have a handful of choices. I do like having choices, LOTS OF ‘EM, and I possess the intelligence to make them — as do most people.

    You see, its really quite simple. You assess your needs, study all possible solutions to your problems and needs, and build/buy/otherwise acquire the solutions.

    More choices give you more flexibility, and more choices from more sources equals greater competition. You alluded to this in your post, while questioning its inherent truth. its thinking like that the monopolists/duopolists love.

    You don’t like netbooks? Its simple, DON’T BUY ONE. You like Macbooks and think they’re worth the money, then BUY ONE. For what its worth, I don’t own a netbook, and I do own (several) Macbooks. But only because after sifting through dozens of choices, I reached the conclusion about what was right for me.

    Take care,
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  45. kennyl98@gmail.com

    Response to Jim S.

    With all due respect to you, and to the guy you quote, I don’t care what he thinks about humans liking to have a handful of choices. I do like having choices, LOTS OF ‘EM, and I possess the intelligence to make them — as do most people.

    You see, its really quite simple. You assess your needs, study all possible solutions to your problems and needs, and build/buy/otherwise acquire the solutions.

    More choices give you more flexibility, and more choices from more sources equals greater competition. You alluded to this in your post, while questioning its inherent truth. its thinking like that the monopolists/duopolists love.

    You don’t like netbooks? Its simple, DON’T BUY ONE. You like Macbooks and think they’re worth the money, then BUY ONE. For what its worth, I don’t own a netbook, and I do own (several) Macbooks. But only because after sifting through dozens of choices, I reached the conclusion about what was right for me.

    Take care,
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  46. jessicafritsche@gmail.com

    I feel like I am in a different universe too, Prompter Bob. I have a Dell Mini 9 and not only is the build quality top notch (and this is coming from an Apple devotee!!), but it runs OS X like a dream. The boot time is crazy fast, sleep and wake from sleep are perfect, I get almost 4 hours of battery life, and all my favorite applications run great, no slow downs and no hangups. I can touch type almost flawlessly (maybe because I was used to the Eee PC keyboard, heh). I have a fully functional, sub-$400 OS X netbook, and it is awesome. Will it keep me from buying more Mac hardware in the future? Definitely not. But I will say that it not only has met but exceeded my expectations for a Hackintosh netbook.

    Reply
  47. jessicafritsche@gmail.com

    I feel like I am in a different universe too, Prompter Bob. I have a Dell Mini 9 and not only is the build quality top notch (and this is coming from an Apple devotee!!), but it runs OS X like a dream. The boot time is crazy fast, sleep and wake from sleep are perfect, I get almost 4 hours of battery life, and all my favorite applications run great, no slow downs and no hangups. I can touch type almost flawlessly (maybe because I was used to the Eee PC keyboard, heh). I have a fully functional, sub-$400 OS X netbook, and it is awesome. Will it keep me from buying more Mac hardware in the future? Definitely not. But I will say that it not only has met but exceeded my expectations for a Hackintosh netbook.

    Reply
  48. jessicafritsche@gmail.com

    I feel like I am in a different universe too, Prompter Bob. I have a Dell Mini 9 and not only is the build quality top notch (and this is coming from an Apple devotee!!), but it runs OS X like a dream. The boot time is crazy fast, sleep and wake from sleep are perfect, I get almost 4 hours of battery life, and all my favorite applications run great, no slow downs and no hangups. I can touch type almost flawlessly (maybe because I was used to the Eee PC keyboard, heh). I have a fully functional, sub-$400 OS X netbook, and it is awesome. Will it keep me from buying more Mac hardware in the future? Definitely not. But I will say that it not only has met but exceeded my expectations for a Hackintosh netbook.

    Reply
  49. jessicafritsche@gmail.com

    I feel like I am in a different universe too, Prompter Bob. I have a Dell Mini 9 and not only is the build quality top notch (and this is coming from an Apple devotee!!), but it runs OS X like a dream. The boot time is crazy fast, sleep and wake from sleep are perfect, I get almost 4 hours of battery life, and all my favorite applications run great, no slow downs and no hangups. I can touch type almost flawlessly (maybe because I was used to the Eee PC keyboard, heh). I have a fully functional, sub-$400 OS X netbook, and it is awesome. Will it keep me from buying more Mac hardware in the future? Definitely not. But I will say that it not only has met but exceeded my expectations for a Hackintosh netbook.

    Reply
  50. jessicafritsche@gmail.com

    I feel like I am in a different universe too, Prompter Bob. I have a Dell Mini 9 and not only is the build quality top notch (and this is coming from an Apple devotee!!), but it runs OS X like a dream. The boot time is crazy fast, sleep and wake from sleep are perfect, I get almost 4 hours of battery life, and all my favorite applications run great, no slow downs and no hangups. I can touch type almost flawlessly (maybe because I was used to the Eee PC keyboard, heh). I have a fully functional, sub-$400 OS X netbook, and it is awesome. Will it keep me from buying more Mac hardware in the future? Definitely not. But I will say that it not only has met but exceeded my expectations for a Hackintosh netbook.

    Reply
  51. scot@mailinator.com

    The dell mini 9 loaded w/ mac OS X is to put it simply – amazing. For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores and plenty of screen space for ordinary tasks. The shell is of decent and granted not apple build quality however still a nifty piece of engineering.
    Aside from editing a feature film there aren’t many tasks that it can not handle. The mac line of notebooks are quickly approaching what was 10 years ago supercomputer status especially w/ the gpu’s included. These machines far outstrip the needs of 99% of their purchasers.

    Reply
  52. scot@mailinator.com

    The dell mini 9 loaded w/ mac OS X is to put it simply – amazing. For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores and plenty of screen space for ordinary tasks. The shell is of decent and granted not apple build quality however still a nifty piece of engineering.
    Aside from editing a feature film there aren’t many tasks that it can not handle. The mac line of notebooks are quickly approaching what was 10 years ago supercomputer status especially w/ the gpu’s included. These machines far outstrip the needs of 99% of their purchasers.

    Reply
  53. scot@mailinator.com

    The dell mini 9 loaded w/ mac OS X is to put it simply – amazing. For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores and plenty of screen space for ordinary tasks. The shell is of decent and granted not apple build quality however still a nifty piece of engineering.
    Aside from editing a feature film there aren’t many tasks that it can not handle. The mac line of notebooks are quickly approaching what was 10 years ago supercomputer status especially w/ the gpu’s included. These machines far outstrip the needs of 99% of their purchasers.

    Reply
  54. scot@mailinator.com

    The dell mini 9 loaded w/ mac OS X is to put it simply – amazing. For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores and plenty of screen space for ordinary tasks. The shell is of decent and granted not apple build quality however still a nifty piece of engineering.
    Aside from editing a feature film there aren’t many tasks that it can not handle. The mac line of notebooks are quickly approaching what was 10 years ago supercomputer status especially w/ the gpu’s included. These machines far outstrip the needs of 99% of their purchasers.

    Reply
  55. scot@mailinator.com

    The dell mini 9 loaded w/ mac OS X is to put it simply – amazing. For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores and plenty of screen space for ordinary tasks. The shell is of decent and granted not apple build quality however still a nifty piece of engineering.
    Aside from editing a feature film there aren’t many tasks that it can not handle. The mac line of notebooks are quickly approaching what was 10 years ago supercomputer status especially w/ the gpu’s included. These machines far outstrip the needs of 99% of their purchasers.

    Reply
  56. eidolon@clearwire.net

    As an Apple user since the first 128K I have not had this much fun for a while. I do not have the Dell but an MSI u100 Wind. It runs a retail install of OS 10.5.6 flawlessly. I do not need a laptop for much since the iPhone does 98% of what I need. The day Apple comes out with a netbook I will order it but for now this is great. I am actually looking forward to the release of the Asus T101H so I can try to do the same on a touch screen/tablet. While I agree that the quality is not what Apple is my little MacBook nano does just fine, thank you very much,

    seeya
    eidolon

    24″ iMac 3.06GHz/4GB/300GB Velociraptor/4TB WD ShareSpace
    MSI u100/432us 1.6GHz/2GB/200GB 7200RPM

    Reply
  57. eidolon@clearwire.net

    As an Apple user since the first 128K I have not had this much fun for a while. I do not have the Dell but an MSI u100 Wind. It runs a retail install of OS 10.5.6 flawlessly. I do not need a laptop for much since the iPhone does 98% of what I need. The day Apple comes out with a netbook I will order it but for now this is great. I am actually looking forward to the release of the Asus T101H so I can try to do the same on a touch screen/tablet. While I agree that the quality is not what Apple is my little MacBook nano does just fine, thank you very much,

    seeya
    eidolon

    24″ iMac 3.06GHz/4GB/300GB Velociraptor/4TB WD ShareSpace
    MSI u100/432us 1.6GHz/2GB/200GB 7200RPM

    Reply
  58. eidolon@clearwire.net

    As an Apple user since the first 128K I have not had this much fun for a while. I do not have the Dell but an MSI u100 Wind. It runs a retail install of OS 10.5.6 flawlessly. I do not need a laptop for much since the iPhone does 98% of what I need. The day Apple comes out with a netbook I will order it but for now this is great. I am actually looking forward to the release of the Asus T101H so I can try to do the same on a touch screen/tablet. While I agree that the quality is not what Apple is my little MacBook nano does just fine, thank you very much,

    seeya
    eidolon

    24″ iMac 3.06GHz/4GB/300GB Velociraptor/4TB WD ShareSpace
    MSI u100/432us 1.6GHz/2GB/200GB 7200RPM

    Reply
  59. eidolon@clearwire.net

    As an Apple user since the first 128K I have not had this much fun for a while. I do not have the Dell but an MSI u100 Wind. It runs a retail install of OS 10.5.6 flawlessly. I do not need a laptop for much since the iPhone does 98% of what I need. The day Apple comes out with a netbook I will order it but for now this is great. I am actually looking forward to the release of the Asus T101H so I can try to do the same on a touch screen/tablet. While I agree that the quality is not what Apple is my little MacBook nano does just fine, thank you very much,

    seeya
    eidolon

    24″ iMac 3.06GHz/4GB/300GB Velociraptor/4TB WD ShareSpace
    MSI u100/432us 1.6GHz/2GB/200GB 7200RPM

    Reply
  60. eidolon@clearwire.net

    As an Apple user since the first 128K I have not had this much fun for a while. I do not have the Dell but an MSI u100 Wind. It runs a retail install of OS 10.5.6 flawlessly. I do not need a laptop for much since the iPhone does 98% of what I need. The day Apple comes out with a netbook I will order it but for now this is great. I am actually looking forward to the release of the Asus T101H so I can try to do the same on a touch screen/tablet. While I agree that the quality is not what Apple is my little MacBook nano does just fine, thank you very much,

    seeya
    eidolon

    24″ iMac 3.06GHz/4GB/300GB Velociraptor/4TB WD ShareSpace
    MSI u100/432us 1.6GHz/2GB/200GB 7200RPM

    Reply
  61. arthur.ducret@yahoo.com

    Very good article Kenny. I do agree with your point, despite the fact that I bought an Acer Aspire One in a late summer trip to D.C. last year.
    I think that when you are on the go, netbooks are very hard to beat. The experience I had: staying at the hotel, being at airports. All of this really explains why a netbook is the way to go. However when you come back to your desk and need to do some real productive work, or want to watch a movie in a comfortable setup, the netbook fails miserably.
    That’s why I’m planning on buying a Unibody MB which, hopefully, will meet my needs in terms of portability and productivity.

    Reply
  62. arthur.ducret@yahoo.com

    Very good article Kenny. I do agree with your point, despite the fact that I bought an Acer Aspire One in a late summer trip to D.C. last year.
    I think that when you are on the go, netbooks are very hard to beat. The experience I had: staying at the hotel, being at airports. All of this really explains why a netbook is the way to go. However when you come back to your desk and need to do some real productive work, or want to watch a movie in a comfortable setup, the netbook fails miserably.
    That’s why I’m planning on buying a Unibody MB which, hopefully, will meet my needs in terms of portability and productivity.

    Reply
  63. arthur.ducret@yahoo.com

    Very good article Kenny. I do agree with your point, despite the fact that I bought an Acer Aspire One in a late summer trip to D.C. last year.
    I think that when you are on the go, netbooks are very hard to beat. The experience I had: staying at the hotel, being at airports. All of this really explains why a netbook is the way to go. However when you come back to your desk and need to do some real productive work, or want to watch a movie in a comfortable setup, the netbook fails miserably.
    That’s why I’m planning on buying a Unibody MB which, hopefully, will meet my needs in terms of portability and productivity.

    Reply
  64. arthur.ducret@yahoo.com

    Very good article Kenny. I do agree with your point, despite the fact that I bought an Acer Aspire One in a late summer trip to D.C. last year.
    I think that when you are on the go, netbooks are very hard to beat. The experience I had: staying at the hotel, being at airports. All of this really explains why a netbook is the way to go. However when you come back to your desk and need to do some real productive work, or want to watch a movie in a comfortable setup, the netbook fails miserably.
    That’s why I’m planning on buying a Unibody MB which, hopefully, will meet my needs in terms of portability and productivity.

    Reply
  65. arthur.ducret@yahoo.com

    Very good article Kenny. I do agree with your point, despite the fact that I bought an Acer Aspire One in a late summer trip to D.C. last year.
    I think that when you are on the go, netbooks are very hard to beat. The experience I had: staying at the hotel, being at airports. All of this really explains why a netbook is the way to go. However when you come back to your desk and need to do some real productive work, or want to watch a movie in a comfortable setup, the netbook fails miserably.
    That’s why I’m planning on buying a Unibody MB which, hopefully, will meet my needs in terms of portability and productivity.

    Reply
  66. mphuie@gmail.com

    I don’t know what unit you’ve been reviewing, but the Dell Mini is build very solidly. The screen is excellent (also LED backlit).

    The keys are small, what do you expect from a small form factor? I do think the key layout could be better (see Vostro A90).

    Of course using one for other than light e-mail, browsing, etc is going to suck. The whole point is to have a computer in places you normally wouldn’t take your notebook (considering most are 4lb+). If you already have a Macbook Air, well a netbook probably isn’t for you.

    Reply
  67. mphuie@gmail.com

    I don’t know what unit you’ve been reviewing, but the Dell Mini is build very solidly. The screen is excellent (also LED backlit).

    The keys are small, what do you expect from a small form factor? I do think the key layout could be better (see Vostro A90).

    Of course using one for other than light e-mail, browsing, etc is going to suck. The whole point is to have a computer in places you normally wouldn’t take your notebook (considering most are 4lb+). If you already have a Macbook Air, well a netbook probably isn’t for you.

    Reply
  68. mphuie@gmail.com

    I don’t know what unit you’ve been reviewing, but the Dell Mini is build very solidly. The screen is excellent (also LED backlit).

    The keys are small, what do you expect from a small form factor? I do think the key layout could be better (see Vostro A90).

    Of course using one for other than light e-mail, browsing, etc is going to suck. The whole point is to have a computer in places you normally wouldn’t take your notebook (considering most are 4lb+). If you already have a Macbook Air, well a netbook probably isn’t for you.

    Reply
  69. mphuie@gmail.com

    I don’t know what unit you’ve been reviewing, but the Dell Mini is build very solidly. The screen is excellent (also LED backlit).

    The keys are small, what do you expect from a small form factor? I do think the key layout could be better (see Vostro A90).

    Of course using one for other than light e-mail, browsing, etc is going to suck. The whole point is to have a computer in places you normally wouldn’t take your notebook (considering most are 4lb+). If you already have a Macbook Air, well a netbook probably isn’t for you.

    Reply
  70. mphuie@gmail.com

    I don’t know what unit you’ve been reviewing, but the Dell Mini is build very solidly. The screen is excellent (also LED backlit).

    The keys are small, what do you expect from a small form factor? I do think the key layout could be better (see Vostro A90).

    Of course using one for other than light e-mail, browsing, etc is going to suck. The whole point is to have a computer in places you normally wouldn’t take your notebook (considering most are 4lb+). If you already have a Macbook Air, well a netbook probably isn’t for you.

    Reply
  71. home@hallm.com

    For a variety of reasons, I own 2 white plastic MacBooks, 1 last gen MacBook Pro, and an aluminum iMac 20″. I also own a Lenovo S10 netbook that I just installed Mac OS 10.5.6 on. Of all those machines, which do I spend the most time using? The netbook. It’s a great machine for consuming information. The build quality is great, it runs 10.5.6 faster in some situations (i.e. wake from sleep, establishing a Wifi connection) than my MacBooks, and it’s so light I can take it practically anywhere. I should also say it runs a heck of a lot cooler than my MacBooks (especially the MBP) for equivalent lightweight tasks such as reading my RSS articles & social networking stuff. Because of how cool, light, and small it is, I find myself having the opportunity to use it in many more situations than before. I wouldn’t write code or do heavy photo or video editing on it. But frankly, I wouldn’t do that on a 13″ or 15″ display in a MacBook or MBP, either, without a good external monitor and extended keyboard setup, anyway. I use Dropbox to keep my files in synch, and synch my MobileMe data, as well.

    As a portable 2nd or 3rd computer, it’s hard to go wrong for $350.

    Reply
  72. home@hallm.com

    For a variety of reasons, I own 2 white plastic MacBooks, 1 last gen MacBook Pro, and an aluminum iMac 20″. I also own a Lenovo S10 netbook that I just installed Mac OS 10.5.6 on. Of all those machines, which do I spend the most time using? The netbook. It’s a great machine for consuming information. The build quality is great, it runs 10.5.6 faster in some situations (i.e. wake from sleep, establishing a Wifi connection) than my MacBooks, and it’s so light I can take it practically anywhere. I should also say it runs a heck of a lot cooler than my MacBooks (especially the MBP) for equivalent lightweight tasks such as reading my RSS articles & social networking stuff. Because of how cool, light, and small it is, I find myself having the opportunity to use it in many more situations than before. I wouldn’t write code or do heavy photo or video editing on it. But frankly, I wouldn’t do that on a 13″ or 15″ display in a MacBook or MBP, either, without a good external monitor and extended keyboard setup, anyway. I use Dropbox to keep my files in synch, and synch my MobileMe data, as well.

    As a portable 2nd or 3rd computer, it’s hard to go wrong for $350.

    Reply
  73. home@hallm.com

    For a variety of reasons, I own 2 white plastic MacBooks, 1 last gen MacBook Pro, and an aluminum iMac 20″. I also own a Lenovo S10 netbook that I just installed Mac OS 10.5.6 on. Of all those machines, which do I spend the most time using? The netbook. It’s a great machine for consuming information. The build quality is great, it runs 10.5.6 faster in some situations (i.e. wake from sleep, establishing a Wifi connection) than my MacBooks, and it’s so light I can take it practically anywhere. I should also say it runs a heck of a lot cooler than my MacBooks (especially the MBP) for equivalent lightweight tasks such as reading my RSS articles & social networking stuff. Because of how cool, light, and small it is, I find myself having the opportunity to use it in many more situations than before. I wouldn’t write code or do heavy photo or video editing on it. But frankly, I wouldn’t do that on a 13″ or 15″ display in a MacBook or MBP, either, without a good external monitor and extended keyboard setup, anyway. I use Dropbox to keep my files in synch, and synch my MobileMe data, as well.

    As a portable 2nd or 3rd computer, it’s hard to go wrong for $350.

    Reply
  74. home@hallm.com

    For a variety of reasons, I own 2 white plastic MacBooks, 1 last gen MacBook Pro, and an aluminum iMac 20″. I also own a Lenovo S10 netbook that I just installed Mac OS 10.5.6 on. Of all those machines, which do I spend the most time using? The netbook. It’s a great machine for consuming information. The build quality is great, it runs 10.5.6 faster in some situations (i.e. wake from sleep, establishing a Wifi connection) than my MacBooks, and it’s so light I can take it practically anywhere. I should also say it runs a heck of a lot cooler than my MacBooks (especially the MBP) for equivalent lightweight tasks such as reading my RSS articles & social networking stuff. Because of how cool, light, and small it is, I find myself having the opportunity to use it in many more situations than before. I wouldn’t write code or do heavy photo or video editing on it. But frankly, I wouldn’t do that on a 13″ or 15″ display in a MacBook or MBP, either, without a good external monitor and extended keyboard setup, anyway. I use Dropbox to keep my files in synch, and synch my MobileMe data, as well.

    As a portable 2nd or 3rd computer, it’s hard to go wrong for $350.

    Reply
  75. home@hallm.com

    For a variety of reasons, I own 2 white plastic MacBooks, 1 last gen MacBook Pro, and an aluminum iMac 20″. I also own a Lenovo S10 netbook that I just installed Mac OS 10.5.6 on. Of all those machines, which do I spend the most time using? The netbook. It’s a great machine for consuming information. The build quality is great, it runs 10.5.6 faster in some situations (i.e. wake from sleep, establishing a Wifi connection) than my MacBooks, and it’s so light I can take it practically anywhere. I should also say it runs a heck of a lot cooler than my MacBooks (especially the MBP) for equivalent lightweight tasks such as reading my RSS articles & social networking stuff. Because of how cool, light, and small it is, I find myself having the opportunity to use it in many more situations than before. I wouldn’t write code or do heavy photo or video editing on it. But frankly, I wouldn’t do that on a 13″ or 15″ display in a MacBook or MBP, either, without a good external monitor and extended keyboard setup, anyway. I use Dropbox to keep my files in synch, and synch my MobileMe data, as well.

    As a portable 2nd or 3rd computer, it’s hard to go wrong for $350.

    Reply
  76. david@macsparky.com

    @Everybody

    Thanks for the informative, spirited debate.

    @Happy Netbook owners

    I get it and am not trying to take away from your experience. I do a lot of writing when I’m at a computer so it just isn’t a viable option. I’d much rather buy a used MacBook with a full size keyboard and screen than a netbook and the small squat form factor just isn’t that important to me. That doesn’t mean it isn’t spectacular for you and that is okay with me. Heck, Andy Ihnatko seems to enjoy his and generally I like EVERYTHING Ihnatko does.

    Reply
  77. david@macsparky.com

    @Everybody

    Thanks for the informative, spirited debate.

    @Happy Netbook owners

    I get it and am not trying to take away from your experience. I do a lot of writing when I’m at a computer so it just isn’t a viable option. I’d much rather buy a used MacBook with a full size keyboard and screen than a netbook and the small squat form factor just isn’t that important to me. That doesn’t mean it isn’t spectacular for you and that is okay with me. Heck, Andy Ihnatko seems to enjoy his and generally I like EVERYTHING Ihnatko does.

    Reply
  78. david@macsparky.com

    @Everybody

    Thanks for the informative, spirited debate.

    @Happy Netbook owners

    I get it and am not trying to take away from your experience. I do a lot of writing when I’m at a computer so it just isn’t a viable option. I’d much rather buy a used MacBook with a full size keyboard and screen than a netbook and the small squat form factor just isn’t that important to me. That doesn’t mean it isn’t spectacular for you and that is okay with me. Heck, Andy Ihnatko seems to enjoy his and generally I like EVERYTHING Ihnatko does.

    Reply
  79. david@macsparky.com

    @Everybody

    Thanks for the informative, spirited debate.

    @Happy Netbook owners

    I get it and am not trying to take away from your experience. I do a lot of writing when I’m at a computer so it just isn’t a viable option. I’d much rather buy a used MacBook with a full size keyboard and screen than a netbook and the small squat form factor just isn’t that important to me. That doesn’t mean it isn’t spectacular for you and that is okay with me. Heck, Andy Ihnatko seems to enjoy his and generally I like EVERYTHING Ihnatko does.

    Reply
  80. david@macsparky.com

    @Everybody

    Thanks for the informative, spirited debate.

    @Happy Netbook owners

    I get it and am not trying to take away from your experience. I do a lot of writing when I’m at a computer so it just isn’t a viable option. I’d much rather buy a used MacBook with a full size keyboard and screen than a netbook and the small squat form factor just isn’t that important to me. That doesn’t mean it isn’t spectacular for you and that is okay with me. Heck, Andy Ihnatko seems to enjoy his and generally I like EVERYTHING Ihnatko does.

    Reply
  81. ducati_dave@sbcglobal.net

    I love my Hackbook Hydrogen! I’ve got OS X, NeoOffice and iLife ’08 on mine (16GB SSD)! It does everything a NetBook should. Build quality is great – when compared to others and community support is awesome!

    Reply
  82. ducati_dave@sbcglobal.net

    I love my Hackbook Hydrogen! I’ve got OS X, NeoOffice and iLife ’08 on mine (16GB SSD)! It does everything a NetBook should. Build quality is great – when compared to others and community support is awesome!

    Reply
  83. ducati_dave@sbcglobal.net

    I love my Hackbook Hydrogen! I’ve got OS X, NeoOffice and iLife ’08 on mine (16GB SSD)! It does everything a NetBook should. Build quality is great – when compared to others and community support is awesome!

    Reply
  84. ducati_dave@sbcglobal.net

    I love my Hackbook Hydrogen! I’ve got OS X, NeoOffice and iLife ’08 on mine (16GB SSD)! It does everything a NetBook should. Build quality is great – when compared to others and community support is awesome!

    Reply
  85. ducati_dave@sbcglobal.net

    I love my Hackbook Hydrogen! I’ve got OS X, NeoOffice and iLife ’08 on mine (16GB SSD)! It does everything a NetBook should. Build quality is great – when compared to others and community support is awesome!

    Reply
  86. dale.kaup@gmail.com

    Seems at last one of the people here is a shill for Apple. Sad to see Apple stooping.

    Dale

    Reply
  87. dale.kaup@gmail.com

    Seems at last one of the people here is a shill for Apple. Sad to see Apple stooping.

    Dale

    Reply
  88. dale.kaup@gmail.com

    Seems at last one of the people here is a shill for Apple. Sad to see Apple stooping.

    Dale

    Reply
  89. dale.kaup@gmail.com

    Seems at last one of the people here is a shill for Apple. Sad to see Apple stooping.

    Dale

    Reply
  90. dale.kaup@gmail.com

    Seems at last one of the people here is a shill for Apple. Sad to see Apple stooping.

    Dale

    Reply
  91. j@justinpeer.com

    I have a macbook pro that I’ve been using for the past couple of years. Prior to that was a last gen Tibook, I’ve had mac laptops since the first powerbook 100 and I’m what you might term an Apple fanboy 9or Macnazi as one of my friends calls me) but I love my hackbook mini9. I cycle or motorbike to work each day and wanted to cut down on the stuff I carry. I needed a machine at work for webbrowsing, skype, email, simple spreadsheets, word processing etc. I have a monitor and full size keyboard on my desk and the dell is a perfect adjunct to the macbook pro.

    I’ve found the build quality excellent, it runs everything smoothly including software updates and I installed from my (paid for) leopard retail disc. Yes, the keyboard on the mini is small but then the entire machine is less than half the zize of my macbook pro, and is more disposable in case of accidents.

    I’m not trying to replace my bigger laptop, I just needed something low powered and smaller. Given that a new macbook (aluminium) starts at £929 in the uk and my mini9 cost me a total of £240 (16Gb ssd, 2Gb ram, hires webcam) it’s a quarter of the cost of a new macbook. It’s certainly more than a quarter as capable.

    I think you were expecting too much of the basic hardware but if you go with the limitations it imposes it’s a great machine. I love mine.

    Reply
  92. j@justinpeer.com

    I have a macbook pro that I’ve been using for the past couple of years. Prior to that was a last gen Tibook, I’ve had mac laptops since the first powerbook 100 and I’m what you might term an Apple fanboy 9or Macnazi as one of my friends calls me) but I love my hackbook mini9. I cycle or motorbike to work each day and wanted to cut down on the stuff I carry. I needed a machine at work for webbrowsing, skype, email, simple spreadsheets, word processing etc. I have a monitor and full size keyboard on my desk and the dell is a perfect adjunct to the macbook pro.

    I’ve found the build quality excellent, it runs everything smoothly including software updates and I installed from my (paid for) leopard retail disc. Yes, the keyboard on the mini is small but then the entire machine is less than half the zize of my macbook pro, and is more disposable in case of accidents.

    I’m not trying to replace my bigger laptop, I just needed something low powered and smaller. Given that a new macbook (aluminium) starts at £929 in the uk and my mini9 cost me a total of £240 (16Gb ssd, 2Gb ram, hires webcam) it’s a quarter of the cost of a new macbook. It’s certainly more than a quarter as capable.

    I think you were expecting too much of the basic hardware but if you go with the limitations it imposes it’s a great machine. I love mine.

    Reply
  93. j@justinpeer.com

    I have a macbook pro that I’ve been using for the past couple of years. Prior to that was a last gen Tibook, I’ve had mac laptops since the first powerbook 100 and I’m what you might term an Apple fanboy 9or Macnazi as one of my friends calls me) but I love my hackbook mini9. I cycle or motorbike to work each day and wanted to cut down on the stuff I carry. I needed a machine at work for webbrowsing, skype, email, simple spreadsheets, word processing etc. I have a monitor and full size keyboard on my desk and the dell is a perfect adjunct to the macbook pro.

    I’ve found the build quality excellent, it runs everything smoothly including software updates and I installed from my (paid for) leopard retail disc. Yes, the keyboard on the mini is small but then the entire machine is less than half the zize of my macbook pro, and is more disposable in case of accidents.

    I’m not trying to replace my bigger laptop, I just needed something low powered and smaller. Given that a new macbook (aluminium) starts at £929 in the uk and my mini9 cost me a total of £240 (16Gb ssd, 2Gb ram, hires webcam) it’s a quarter of the cost of a new macbook. It’s certainly more than a quarter as capable.

    I think you were expecting too much of the basic hardware but if you go with the limitations it imposes it’s a great machine. I love mine.

    Reply
  94. j@justinpeer.com

    I have a macbook pro that I’ve been using for the past couple of years. Prior to that was a last gen Tibook, I’ve had mac laptops since the first powerbook 100 and I’m what you might term an Apple fanboy 9or Macnazi as one of my friends calls me) but I love my hackbook mini9. I cycle or motorbike to work each day and wanted to cut down on the stuff I carry. I needed a machine at work for webbrowsing, skype, email, simple spreadsheets, word processing etc. I have a monitor and full size keyboard on my desk and the dell is a perfect adjunct to the macbook pro.

    I’ve found the build quality excellent, it runs everything smoothly including software updates and I installed from my (paid for) leopard retail disc. Yes, the keyboard on the mini is small but then the entire machine is less than half the zize of my macbook pro, and is more disposable in case of accidents.

    I’m not trying to replace my bigger laptop, I just needed something low powered and smaller. Given that a new macbook (aluminium) starts at £929 in the uk and my mini9 cost me a total of £240 (16Gb ssd, 2Gb ram, hires webcam) it’s a quarter of the cost of a new macbook. It’s certainly more than a quarter as capable.

    I think you were expecting too much of the basic hardware but if you go with the limitations it imposes it’s a great machine. I love mine.

    Reply
  95. j@justinpeer.com

    I have a macbook pro that I’ve been using for the past couple of years. Prior to that was a last gen Tibook, I’ve had mac laptops since the first powerbook 100 and I’m what you might term an Apple fanboy 9or Macnazi as one of my friends calls me) but I love my hackbook mini9. I cycle or motorbike to work each day and wanted to cut down on the stuff I carry. I needed a machine at work for webbrowsing, skype, email, simple spreadsheets, word processing etc. I have a monitor and full size keyboard on my desk and the dell is a perfect adjunct to the macbook pro.

    I’ve found the build quality excellent, it runs everything smoothly including software updates and I installed from my (paid for) leopard retail disc. Yes, the keyboard on the mini is small but then the entire machine is less than half the zize of my macbook pro, and is more disposable in case of accidents.

    I’m not trying to replace my bigger laptop, I just needed something low powered and smaller. Given that a new macbook (aluminium) starts at £929 in the uk and my mini9 cost me a total of £240 (16Gb ssd, 2Gb ram, hires webcam) it’s a quarter of the cost of a new macbook. It’s certainly more than a quarter as capable.

    I think you were expecting too much of the basic hardware but if you go with the limitations it imposes it’s a great machine. I love mine.

    Reply
  96. notme@nothere.com

    I don’t understand why people say the CPU is only good for web browsing, word processing, and email. 1.6GHz is plenty for all but the most intensive games and applications available today. I’ve been writing game code (physics simulation + OpenGL) on my hackintosh Mini 9 (1GB RAM, 32 GB SSD) over the last couple weeks since I got it. I run the XCode IDE, my game code, a web browser and other apps in the background with no problems at all. It’s not my main computer, but it’s perfect when I’m sitting on the couch or on a trip somewhere.

    Reply
  97. notme@nothere.com

    I don’t understand why people say the CPU is only good for web browsing, word processing, and email. 1.6GHz is plenty for all but the most intensive games and applications available today. I’ve been writing game code (physics simulation + OpenGL) on my hackintosh Mini 9 (1GB RAM, 32 GB SSD) over the last couple weeks since I got it. I run the XCode IDE, my game code, a web browser and other apps in the background with no problems at all. It’s not my main computer, but it’s perfect when I’m sitting on the couch or on a trip somewhere.

    Reply
  98. notme@nothere.com

    I don’t understand why people say the CPU is only good for web browsing, word processing, and email. 1.6GHz is plenty for all but the most intensive games and applications available today. I’ve been writing game code (physics simulation + OpenGL) on my hackintosh Mini 9 (1GB RAM, 32 GB SSD) over the last couple weeks since I got it. I run the XCode IDE, my game code, a web browser and other apps in the background with no problems at all. It’s not my main computer, but it’s perfect when I’m sitting on the couch or on a trip somewhere.

    Reply
  99. notme@nothere.com

    I don’t understand why people say the CPU is only good for web browsing, word processing, and email. 1.6GHz is plenty for all but the most intensive games and applications available today. I’ve been writing game code (physics simulation + OpenGL) on my hackintosh Mini 9 (1GB RAM, 32 GB SSD) over the last couple weeks since I got it. I run the XCode IDE, my game code, a web browser and other apps in the background with no problems at all. It’s not my main computer, but it’s perfect when I’m sitting on the couch or on a trip somewhere.

    Reply
  100. notme@nothere.com

    I don’t understand why people say the CPU is only good for web browsing, word processing, and email. 1.6GHz is plenty for all but the most intensive games and applications available today. I’ve been writing game code (physics simulation + OpenGL) on my hackintosh Mini 9 (1GB RAM, 32 GB SSD) over the last couple weeks since I got it. I run the XCode IDE, my game code, a web browser and other apps in the background with no problems at all. It’s not my main computer, but it’s perfect when I’m sitting on the couch or on a trip somewhere.

    Reply
  101. casella@notomotorediricerca.com

    David, from one point of view you have summarized perfectly what a netbook is good at:

    “This is fine for web browsing, e-mail, and word processing, but that is about it.”

    From another point of view you missed the point: the netbook is about connectivity on the move, again web browsing, e-mail, and word processing.

    A computer savvy user will buy a proper computer (think about a 500$ 14 inches celeron machine as entry point). The occasional user will buy a netbook or even something cheaper.

    From my point of view, I really like the MacBook, but I really would like to have something around 11 inches to write email while traveling. Something like an old 12 inches PowerBook would provide also additional capabilities, but if a netbook does allow me to write emails on the move I do not see why I should buy something different/more expensive (after all I have a Mac on the desktop that has all the power I need).

    Reply
  102. casella@notomotorediricerca.com

    David, from one point of view you have summarized perfectly what a netbook is good at:

    “This is fine for web browsing, e-mail, and word processing, but that is about it.”

    From another point of view you missed the point: the netbook is about connectivity on the move, again web browsing, e-mail, and word processing.

    A computer savvy user will buy a proper computer (think about a 500$ 14 inches celeron machine as entry point). The occasional user will buy a netbook or even something cheaper.

    From my point of view, I really like the MacBook, but I really would like to have something around 11 inches to write email while traveling. Something like an old 12 inches PowerBook would provide also additional capabilities, but if a netbook does allow me to write emails on the move I do not see why I should buy something different/more expensive (after all I have a Mac on the desktop that has all the power I need).

    Reply
  103. casella@notomotorediricerca.com

    David, from one point of view you have summarized perfectly what a netbook is good at:

    “This is fine for web browsing, e-mail, and word processing, but that is about it.”

    From another point of view you missed the point: the netbook is about connectivity on the move, again web browsing, e-mail, and word processing.

    A computer savvy user will buy a proper computer (think about a 500$ 14 inches celeron machine as entry point). The occasional user will buy a netbook or even something cheaper.

    From my point of view, I really like the MacBook, but I really would like to have something around 11 inches to write email while traveling. Something like an old 12 inches PowerBook would provide also additional capabilities, but if a netbook does allow me to write emails on the move I do not see why I should buy something different/more expensive (after all I have a Mac on the desktop that has all the power I need).

    Reply
  104. casella@notomotorediricerca.com

    David, from one point of view you have summarized perfectly what a netbook is good at:

    “This is fine for web browsing, e-mail, and word processing, but that is about it.”

    From another point of view you missed the point: the netbook is about connectivity on the move, again web browsing, e-mail, and word processing.

    A computer savvy user will buy a proper computer (think about a 500$ 14 inches celeron machine as entry point). The occasional user will buy a netbook or even something cheaper.

    From my point of view, I really like the MacBook, but I really would like to have something around 11 inches to write email while traveling. Something like an old 12 inches PowerBook would provide also additional capabilities, but if a netbook does allow me to write emails on the move I do not see why I should buy something different/more expensive (after all I have a Mac on the desktop that has all the power I need).

    Reply
  105. casella@notomotorediricerca.com

    David, from one point of view you have summarized perfectly what a netbook is good at:

    “This is fine for web browsing, e-mail, and word processing, but that is about it.”

    From another point of view you missed the point: the netbook is about connectivity on the move, again web browsing, e-mail, and word processing.

    A computer savvy user will buy a proper computer (think about a 500$ 14 inches celeron machine as entry point). The occasional user will buy a netbook or even something cheaper.

    From my point of view, I really like the MacBook, but I really would like to have something around 11 inches to write email while traveling. Something like an old 12 inches PowerBook would provide also additional capabilities, but if a netbook does allow me to write emails on the move I do not see why I should buy something different/more expensive (after all I have a Mac on the desktop that has all the power I need).

    Reply
  106. Noway@noway.com

    I love to write python code on an Acer netbook. The small keyboard took some time to get use to. For years I refused to buy a “NoteBook” because of their size and price.

    Reply
  107. Noway@noway.com

    I love to write python code on an Acer netbook. The small keyboard took some time to get use to. For years I refused to buy a “NoteBook” because of their size and price.

    Reply
  108. Noway@noway.com

    I love to write python code on an Acer netbook. The small keyboard took some time to get use to. For years I refused to buy a “NoteBook” because of their size and price.

    Reply
  109. Noway@noway.com

    I love to write python code on an Acer netbook. The small keyboard took some time to get use to. For years I refused to buy a “NoteBook” because of their size and price.

    Reply
  110. Noway@noway.com

    I love to write python code on an Acer netbook. The small keyboard took some time to get use to. For years I refused to buy a “NoteBook” because of their size and price.

    Reply
  111. BlackMichaelangelo3000@gmail.com

    “I’d suggest… getting a theft and damage insurance policy on your existing Mac … that costs me $100 a year and gets me a full replacement in the event of a catastrphe.”

    Sir… could you please provide me with the Insurance Company INFO
    that I may inquire and purchase a policy for my computer and
    electronic equipment. Thank you in advance.

    Mic

    Reply
  112. BlackMichaelangelo3000@gmail.com

    “I’d suggest… getting a theft and damage insurance policy on your existing Mac … that costs me $100 a year and gets me a full replacement in the event of a catastrphe.”

    Sir… could you please provide me with the Insurance Company INFO
    that I may inquire and purchase a policy for my computer and
    electronic equipment. Thank you in advance.

    Mic

    Reply
  113. BlackMichaelangelo3000@gmail.com

    “I’d suggest… getting a theft and damage insurance policy on your existing Mac … that costs me $100 a year and gets me a full replacement in the event of a catastrphe.”

    Sir… could you please provide me with the Insurance Company INFO
    that I may inquire and purchase a policy for my computer and
    electronic equipment. Thank you in advance.

    Mic

    Reply
  114. BlackMichaelangelo3000@gmail.com

    “I’d suggest… getting a theft and damage insurance policy on your existing Mac … that costs me $100 a year and gets me a full replacement in the event of a catastrphe.”

    Sir… could you please provide me with the Insurance Company INFO
    that I may inquire and purchase a policy for my computer and
    electronic equipment. Thank you in advance.

    Mic

    Reply
  115. BlackMichaelangelo3000@gmail.com

    “I’d suggest… getting a theft and damage insurance policy on your existing Mac … that costs me $100 a year and gets me a full replacement in the event of a catastrphe.”

    Sir… could you please provide me with the Insurance Company INFO
    that I may inquire and purchase a policy for my computer and
    electronic equipment. Thank you in advance.

    Mic

    Reply
  116. dans@csufresno.edu

    I am an Apple devotee to the max. I am also reading and writing on a Dell Mini 9 running OSX. I love this computer almost like none other that I’ve had. It runs OS X perfectly; it is as stable as any Mac that I’ve ever used. Also, it doesn’t seem so cheap to me. Just about perfect. Sorry, but I needed a netbook, and this absolutely fills the bill.

    Reply
  117. dans@csufresno.edu

    I am an Apple devotee to the max. I am also reading and writing on a Dell Mini 9 running OSX. I love this computer almost like none other that I’ve had. It runs OS X perfectly; it is as stable as any Mac that I’ve ever used. Also, it doesn’t seem so cheap to me. Just about perfect. Sorry, but I needed a netbook, and this absolutely fills the bill.

    Reply
  118. dans@csufresno.edu

    I am an Apple devotee to the max. I am also reading and writing on a Dell Mini 9 running OSX. I love this computer almost like none other that I’ve had. It runs OS X perfectly; it is as stable as any Mac that I’ve ever used. Also, it doesn’t seem so cheap to me. Just about perfect. Sorry, but I needed a netbook, and this absolutely fills the bill.

    Reply
  119. dans@csufresno.edu

    I am an Apple devotee to the max. I am also reading and writing on a Dell Mini 9 running OSX. I love this computer almost like none other that I’ve had. It runs OS X perfectly; it is as stable as any Mac that I’ve ever used. Also, it doesn’t seem so cheap to me. Just about perfect. Sorry, but I needed a netbook, and this absolutely fills the bill.

    Reply
  120. dans@csufresno.edu

    I am an Apple devotee to the max. I am also reading and writing on a Dell Mini 9 running OSX. I love this computer almost like none other that I’ve had. It runs OS X perfectly; it is as stable as any Mac that I’ve ever used. Also, it doesn’t seem so cheap to me. Just about perfect. Sorry, but I needed a netbook, and this absolutely fills the bill.

    Reply
  121. salumbre@gmail.com

    @Todd McCann:

    I hope you didn’t use your real name, or that your wife is as blind as her mother…

    Reply
  122. salumbre@gmail.com

    @Todd McCann:

    I hope you didn’t use your real name, or that your wife is as blind as her mother…

    Reply
  123. salumbre@gmail.com

    @Todd McCann:

    I hope you didn’t use your real name, or that your wife is as blind as her mother…

    Reply
  124. salumbre@gmail.com

    @Todd McCann:

    I hope you didn’t use your real name, or that your wife is as blind as her mother…

    Reply
  125. salumbre@gmail.com

    @Todd McCann:

    I hope you didn’t use your real name, or that your wife is as blind as her mother…

    Reply
  126. lawncoscott@excite.com

    I bought an older 12″ Powerbook G4 (1 ghz, 1 G of Ram) to have something small and portable. With Leopard installed, it felt quite sluggish and had a rough time doing the basics you’d do on a netbook. My Dell Mini 9 felt more responsive, had an as good / better viewing experience, and much better boot time, etc. Better still, the Powerbook got a Geekbench score of 451… the Dell mini – better than twice that at 919. For the ultra portable experience, I find the Dell Mini just fine.

    Reply
  127. lawncoscott@excite.com

    I bought an older 12″ Powerbook G4 (1 ghz, 1 G of Ram) to have something small and portable. With Leopard installed, it felt quite sluggish and had a rough time doing the basics you’d do on a netbook. My Dell Mini 9 felt more responsive, had an as good / better viewing experience, and much better boot time, etc. Better still, the Powerbook got a Geekbench score of 451… the Dell mini – better than twice that at 919. For the ultra portable experience, I find the Dell Mini just fine.

    Reply
  128. lawncoscott@excite.com

    I bought an older 12″ Powerbook G4 (1 ghz, 1 G of Ram) to have something small and portable. With Leopard installed, it felt quite sluggish and had a rough time doing the basics you’d do on a netbook. My Dell Mini 9 felt more responsive, had an as good / better viewing experience, and much better boot time, etc. Better still, the Powerbook got a Geekbench score of 451… the Dell mini – better than twice that at 919. For the ultra portable experience, I find the Dell Mini just fine.

    Reply
  129. lawncoscott@excite.com

    I bought an older 12″ Powerbook G4 (1 ghz, 1 G of Ram) to have something small and portable. With Leopard installed, it felt quite sluggish and had a rough time doing the basics you’d do on a netbook. My Dell Mini 9 felt more responsive, had an as good / better viewing experience, and much better boot time, etc. Better still, the Powerbook got a Geekbench score of 451… the Dell mini – better than twice that at 919. For the ultra portable experience, I find the Dell Mini just fine.

    Reply
  130. lawncoscott@excite.com

    I bought an older 12″ Powerbook G4 (1 ghz, 1 G of Ram) to have something small and portable. With Leopard installed, it felt quite sluggish and had a rough time doing the basics you’d do on a netbook. My Dell Mini 9 felt more responsive, had an as good / better viewing experience, and much better boot time, etc. Better still, the Powerbook got a Geekbench score of 451… the Dell mini – better than twice that at 919. For the ultra portable experience, I find the Dell Mini just fine.

    Reply
  131. srvirata@aol.com

    This debate is interesting, but I prefer my Dell Mini over my MacBook for travel because of the size. I carry my iPods, large SLR camera, and the Mini in a backpack. My MacBook just doesn’t fit. But around the house, the MacBook rules.

    I’d love a 1024 x 768 minimum screen with a regular keyboard (even if not quite 100% in size). I don’t think I could type very long on a touchscreen (my iPod touch gets difficult after a few minutes).

    Reply
  132. srvirata@aol.com

    This debate is interesting, but I prefer my Dell Mini over my MacBook for travel because of the size. I carry my iPods, large SLR camera, and the Mini in a backpack. My MacBook just doesn’t fit. But around the house, the MacBook rules.

    I’d love a 1024 x 768 minimum screen with a regular keyboard (even if not quite 100% in size). I don’t think I could type very long on a touchscreen (my iPod touch gets difficult after a few minutes).

    Reply
  133. srvirata@aol.com

    This debate is interesting, but I prefer my Dell Mini over my MacBook for travel because of the size. I carry my iPods, large SLR camera, and the Mini in a backpack. My MacBook just doesn’t fit. But around the house, the MacBook rules.

    I’d love a 1024 x 768 minimum screen with a regular keyboard (even if not quite 100% in size). I don’t think I could type very long on a touchscreen (my iPod touch gets difficult after a few minutes).

    Reply
  134. srvirata@aol.com

    This debate is interesting, but I prefer my Dell Mini over my MacBook for travel because of the size. I carry my iPods, large SLR camera, and the Mini in a backpack. My MacBook just doesn’t fit. But around the house, the MacBook rules.

    I’d love a 1024 x 768 minimum screen with a regular keyboard (even if not quite 100% in size). I don’t think I could type very long on a touchscreen (my iPod touch gets difficult after a few minutes).

    Reply
  135. srvirata@aol.com

    This debate is interesting, but I prefer my Dell Mini over my MacBook for travel because of the size. I carry my iPods, large SLR camera, and the Mini in a backpack. My MacBook just doesn’t fit. But around the house, the MacBook rules.

    I’d love a 1024 x 768 minimum screen with a regular keyboard (even if not quite 100% in size). I don’t think I could type very long on a touchscreen (my iPod touch gets difficult after a few minutes).

    Reply
  136. drwam@yahoo.com

    As a mac users since my SE/30 and an Apple shareholder, you have been too harsh. The big problems are the poor keyboard and the teeny trackpad (exacerbated by bad drivers). A better keyboard would mean changing the shape of the thing. A real computer designer like Apple could work this out. Maybe there are quality control problems since the build quality on mine is sturdy. The virtue of the thing is that it is so very small and light. The screen is small because of this. However the screen is big enough to do basic computing usefully. The thing for Apple to learn here is that small and cheap and adequate has a utility which is quite surprising. One of these done right by Apple would be a killer product. The MacBook Air is a great design that is overpriced and is too minimalist (no ethernet is INFURIATING). I hope Apple does make a MacBook Mini and not just a (loser) mediapad/overgrown iPhone.

    Reply
  137. drwam@yahoo.com

    As a mac users since my SE/30 and an Apple shareholder, you have been too harsh. The big problems are the poor keyboard and the teeny trackpad (exacerbated by bad drivers). A better keyboard would mean changing the shape of the thing. A real computer designer like Apple could work this out. Maybe there are quality control problems since the build quality on mine is sturdy. The virtue of the thing is that it is so very small and light. The screen is small because of this. However the screen is big enough to do basic computing usefully. The thing for Apple to learn here is that small and cheap and adequate has a utility which is quite surprising. One of these done right by Apple would be a killer product. The MacBook Air is a great design that is overpriced and is too minimalist (no ethernet is INFURIATING). I hope Apple does make a MacBook Mini and not just a (loser) mediapad/overgrown iPhone.

    Reply
  138. drwam@yahoo.com

    As a mac users since my SE/30 and an Apple shareholder, you have been too harsh. The big problems are the poor keyboard and the teeny trackpad (exacerbated by bad drivers). A better keyboard would mean changing the shape of the thing. A real computer designer like Apple could work this out. Maybe there are quality control problems since the build quality on mine is sturdy. The virtue of the thing is that it is so very small and light. The screen is small because of this. However the screen is big enough to do basic computing usefully. The thing for Apple to learn here is that small and cheap and adequate has a utility which is quite surprising. One of these done right by Apple would be a killer product. The MacBook Air is a great design that is overpriced and is too minimalist (no ethernet is INFURIATING). I hope Apple does make a MacBook Mini and not just a (loser) mediapad/overgrown iPhone.

    Reply
  139. drwam@yahoo.com

    As a mac users since my SE/30 and an Apple shareholder, you have been too harsh. The big problems are the poor keyboard and the teeny trackpad (exacerbated by bad drivers). A better keyboard would mean changing the shape of the thing. A real computer designer like Apple could work this out. Maybe there are quality control problems since the build quality on mine is sturdy. The virtue of the thing is that it is so very small and light. The screen is small because of this. However the screen is big enough to do basic computing usefully. The thing for Apple to learn here is that small and cheap and adequate has a utility which is quite surprising. One of these done right by Apple would be a killer product. The MacBook Air is a great design that is overpriced and is too minimalist (no ethernet is INFURIATING). I hope Apple does make a MacBook Mini and not just a (loser) mediapad/overgrown iPhone.

    Reply
  140. drwam@yahoo.com

    As a mac users since my SE/30 and an Apple shareholder, you have been too harsh. The big problems are the poor keyboard and the teeny trackpad (exacerbated by bad drivers). A better keyboard would mean changing the shape of the thing. A real computer designer like Apple could work this out. Maybe there are quality control problems since the build quality on mine is sturdy. The virtue of the thing is that it is so very small and light. The screen is small because of this. However the screen is big enough to do basic computing usefully. The thing for Apple to learn here is that small and cheap and adequate has a utility which is quite surprising. One of these done right by Apple would be a killer product. The MacBook Air is a great design that is overpriced and is too minimalist (no ethernet is INFURIATING). I hope Apple does make a MacBook Mini and not just a (loser) mediapad/overgrown iPhone.

    Reply
  141. dlgcn7@mmt.edu

    I have a Acer netbook and love it. It is not a high power computer. It is intended to serve certain functions. I have it so I do not have to carry the weight. I do not have a Macbook Air because I do not want to spend $1600 on a crippled machine. $300 is the right price range. I can afford anything I want but I will not waste money. As far as them being Junk, Steve Jobs needs to clean up at home. My recent Imac has been in the shop 6 times in 6 months with different component failures. It is made in China just like all of the PCs. It may well be my last. I like the idea of putting OSX on a netbook. I may buy another one to try it on.

    Reply
  142. dlgcn7@mmt.edu

    I have a Acer netbook and love it. It is not a high power computer. It is intended to serve certain functions. I have it so I do not have to carry the weight. I do not have a Macbook Air because I do not want to spend $1600 on a crippled machine. $300 is the right price range. I can afford anything I want but I will not waste money. As far as them being Junk, Steve Jobs needs to clean up at home. My recent Imac has been in the shop 6 times in 6 months with different component failures. It is made in China just like all of the PCs. It may well be my last. I like the idea of putting OSX on a netbook. I may buy another one to try it on.

    Reply
  143. dlgcn7@mmt.edu

    I have a Acer netbook and love it. It is not a high power computer. It is intended to serve certain functions. I have it so I do not have to carry the weight. I do not have a Macbook Air because I do not want to spend $1600 on a crippled machine. $300 is the right price range. I can afford anything I want but I will not waste money. As far as them being Junk, Steve Jobs needs to clean up at home. My recent Imac has been in the shop 6 times in 6 months with different component failures. It is made in China just like all of the PCs. It may well be my last. I like the idea of putting OSX on a netbook. I may buy another one to try it on.

    Reply
  144. dlgcn7@mmt.edu

    I have a Acer netbook and love it. It is not a high power computer. It is intended to serve certain functions. I have it so I do not have to carry the weight. I do not have a Macbook Air because I do not want to spend $1600 on a crippled machine. $300 is the right price range. I can afford anything I want but I will not waste money. As far as them being Junk, Steve Jobs needs to clean up at home. My recent Imac has been in the shop 6 times in 6 months with different component failures. It is made in China just like all of the PCs. It may well be my last. I like the idea of putting OSX on a netbook. I may buy another one to try it on.

    Reply
  145. dlgcn7@mmt.edu

    I have a Acer netbook and love it. It is not a high power computer. It is intended to serve certain functions. I have it so I do not have to carry the weight. I do not have a Macbook Air because I do not want to spend $1600 on a crippled machine. $300 is the right price range. I can afford anything I want but I will not waste money. As far as them being Junk, Steve Jobs needs to clean up at home. My recent Imac has been in the shop 6 times in 6 months with different component failures. It is made in China just like all of the PCs. It may well be my last. I like the idea of putting OSX on a netbook. I may buy another one to try it on.

    Reply
  146. johndchandler@gmail.com

    Wow…quite the discussion you’ve stirred David.

    My only addition would be to suggest that not all netbooks are the same. I have an MSI Wind, but previously had tried the original Asus EEE. It had a 7″ screen but shares the same form factor as their newer 9″ models. From my experience, the 10″ netbooks offer a much more usuable keyboard size than the 9″ (or less) netbooks.

    I would not use the Wind as a primary computer, but it is fantastic for certain uses. I took it on a weeklong trip a few months ago and it was perfect for travel. The one shortcoming is the touchpad, which is a far cry from the touchpad on my MacBook Pro.

    Reply
  147. johndchandler@gmail.com

    Wow…quite the discussion you’ve stirred David.

    My only addition would be to suggest that not all netbooks are the same. I have an MSI Wind, but previously had tried the original Asus EEE. It had a 7″ screen but shares the same form factor as their newer 9″ models. From my experience, the 10″ netbooks offer a much more usuable keyboard size than the 9″ (or less) netbooks.

    I would not use the Wind as a primary computer, but it is fantastic for certain uses. I took it on a weeklong trip a few months ago and it was perfect for travel. The one shortcoming is the touchpad, which is a far cry from the touchpad on my MacBook Pro.

    Reply
  148. johndchandler@gmail.com

    Wow…quite the discussion you’ve stirred David.

    My only addition would be to suggest that not all netbooks are the same. I have an MSI Wind, but previously had tried the original Asus EEE. It had a 7″ screen but shares the same form factor as their newer 9″ models. From my experience, the 10″ netbooks offer a much more usuable keyboard size than the 9″ (or less) netbooks.

    I would not use the Wind as a primary computer, but it is fantastic for certain uses. I took it on a weeklong trip a few months ago and it was perfect for travel. The one shortcoming is the touchpad, which is a far cry from the touchpad on my MacBook Pro.

    Reply
  149. johndchandler@gmail.com

    Wow…quite the discussion you’ve stirred David.

    My only addition would be to suggest that not all netbooks are the same. I have an MSI Wind, but previously had tried the original Asus EEE. It had a 7″ screen but shares the same form factor as their newer 9″ models. From my experience, the 10″ netbooks offer a much more usuable keyboard size than the 9″ (or less) netbooks.

    I would not use the Wind as a primary computer, but it is fantastic for certain uses. I took it on a weeklong trip a few months ago and it was perfect for travel. The one shortcoming is the touchpad, which is a far cry from the touchpad on my MacBook Pro.

    Reply
  150. johndchandler@gmail.com

    Wow…quite the discussion you’ve stirred David.

    My only addition would be to suggest that not all netbooks are the same. I have an MSI Wind, but previously had tried the original Asus EEE. It had a 7″ screen but shares the same form factor as their newer 9″ models. From my experience, the 10″ netbooks offer a much more usuable keyboard size than the 9″ (or less) netbooks.

    I would not use the Wind as a primary computer, but it is fantastic for certain uses. I took it on a weeklong trip a few months ago and it was perfect for travel. The one shortcoming is the touchpad, which is a far cry from the touchpad on my MacBook Pro.

    Reply
  151. Voigt.mike@gmail.com

    I still use (and fix and sell) old Apple iBooks. They aren’t quite as snappy or as compact as these netbooks, but the full size keyboard and 12″ screen make up for that. The 12″ form factor is the perfect balance of portability and everyday useablity. They are roughly the same price. I personally won’t be jumping on this netbook bandwagon, but to each his own

    Reply
  152. Voigt.mike@gmail.com

    I still use (and fix and sell) old Apple iBooks. They aren’t quite as snappy or as compact as these netbooks, but the full size keyboard and 12″ screen make up for that. The 12″ form factor is the perfect balance of portability and everyday useablity. They are roughly the same price. I personally won’t be jumping on this netbook bandwagon, but to each his own

    Reply
  153. Voigt.mike@gmail.com

    I still use (and fix and sell) old Apple iBooks. They aren’t quite as snappy or as compact as these netbooks, but the full size keyboard and 12″ screen make up for that. The 12″ form factor is the perfect balance of portability and everyday useablity. They are roughly the same price. I personally won’t be jumping on this netbook bandwagon, but to each his own

    Reply
  154. Voigt.mike@gmail.com

    I still use (and fix and sell) old Apple iBooks. They aren’t quite as snappy or as compact as these netbooks, but the full size keyboard and 12″ screen make up for that. The 12″ form factor is the perfect balance of portability and everyday useablity. They are roughly the same price. I personally won’t be jumping on this netbook bandwagon, but to each his own

    Reply
  155. Voigt.mike@gmail.com

    I still use (and fix and sell) old Apple iBooks. They aren’t quite as snappy or as compact as these netbooks, but the full size keyboard and 12″ screen make up for that. The 12″ form factor is the perfect balance of portability and everyday useablity. They are roughly the same price. I personally won’t be jumping on this netbook bandwagon, but to each his own

    Reply
  156. cgdg@dggitt.com

    After borrowing a mini 9 with OS X for a few days and generally liking it, I ended up buying a refurb MacBook Air for a thousand bucks. Yes, it’s twice the cost of a netbook (factoring in a retail Leopard DVD purchase). Both the MBA and netbooks are compromises, not intended to be main computers, and likely will be obsolete sooner than later. For my work/travel needs, though, the MBA was the better option for writing, some web programming & graphic design, and music composition. Unless I misunderstood the stats, the MBA’s 1.6 Core 2 Duo is much more powerful than the 1.6 Atom processor found in most netbooks. Anyway, all our needs, space, cash and time vary. I’m glad the netbook opition is out there. I’ll probably get one in a couple of years when they get even better.

    Reply
  157. cgdg@dggitt.com

    After borrowing a mini 9 with OS X for a few days and generally liking it, I ended up buying a refurb MacBook Air for a thousand bucks. Yes, it’s twice the cost of a netbook (factoring in a retail Leopard DVD purchase). Both the MBA and netbooks are compromises, not intended to be main computers, and likely will be obsolete sooner than later. For my work/travel needs, though, the MBA was the better option for writing, some web programming & graphic design, and music composition. Unless I misunderstood the stats, the MBA’s 1.6 Core 2 Duo is much more powerful than the 1.6 Atom processor found in most netbooks. Anyway, all our needs, space, cash and time vary. I’m glad the netbook opition is out there. I’ll probably get one in a couple of years when they get even better.

    Reply
  158. cgdg@dggitt.com

    After borrowing a mini 9 with OS X for a few days and generally liking it, I ended up buying a refurb MacBook Air for a thousand bucks. Yes, it’s twice the cost of a netbook (factoring in a retail Leopard DVD purchase). Both the MBA and netbooks are compromises, not intended to be main computers, and likely will be obsolete sooner than later. For my work/travel needs, though, the MBA was the better option for writing, some web programming & graphic design, and music composition. Unless I misunderstood the stats, the MBA’s 1.6 Core 2 Duo is much more powerful than the 1.6 Atom processor found in most netbooks. Anyway, all our needs, space, cash and time vary. I’m glad the netbook opition is out there. I’ll probably get one in a couple of years when they get even better.

    Reply
  159. cgdg@dggitt.com

    After borrowing a mini 9 with OS X for a few days and generally liking it, I ended up buying a refurb MacBook Air for a thousand bucks. Yes, it’s twice the cost of a netbook (factoring in a retail Leopard DVD purchase). Both the MBA and netbooks are compromises, not intended to be main computers, and likely will be obsolete sooner than later. For my work/travel needs, though, the MBA was the better option for writing, some web programming & graphic design, and music composition. Unless I misunderstood the stats, the MBA’s 1.6 Core 2 Duo is much more powerful than the 1.6 Atom processor found in most netbooks. Anyway, all our needs, space, cash and time vary. I’m glad the netbook opition is out there. I’ll probably get one in a couple of years when they get even better.

    Reply
  160. cgdg@dggitt.com

    After borrowing a mini 9 with OS X for a few days and generally liking it, I ended up buying a refurb MacBook Air for a thousand bucks. Yes, it’s twice the cost of a netbook (factoring in a retail Leopard DVD purchase). Both the MBA and netbooks are compromises, not intended to be main computers, and likely will be obsolete sooner than later. For my work/travel needs, though, the MBA was the better option for writing, some web programming & graphic design, and music composition. Unless I misunderstood the stats, the MBA’s 1.6 Core 2 Duo is much more powerful than the 1.6 Atom processor found in most netbooks. Anyway, all our needs, space, cash and time vary. I’m glad the netbook opition is out there. I’ll probably get one in a couple of years when they get even better.

    Reply
  161. zachary.b@gmail.com

    Wow, a whole lot of you just sound like self-important a-holes who just don’t get it…
    |
    With the exception of a Dell Mini 9 that I bought recently (and that I am using right now) I’ve been computing solely on Mac hardware for the last decade.
    |
    Personally speaking I find the build quality on the Mini 9 to be more than adequate. The plastic body is solidly built, easy to crack open to improve the RAM or add a larger SSD, and the size is perfect for throwing into a bag or purse for light computing on the go.
    |
    From the way you describe it I wonder if the unit you used was defective, particularly when it comes to the battery. The battery in my unit is held solidly in place and doesn’t budge even with repeated prodding.
    |
    Sure, the keyboard is a little small and the key layout is a bit questionable, and the screen is a little dim and a little smaller than I’d like, but as far as I’m concerned it’s a fair exchange for the almost-pocketable size of the Mini 9.
    |
    I can afford a Mac. In fact I own several and I like them a lot. But until Apple comes out with an ultra-mini PC I’m more than happy with my Dell Mini 9.

    Reply
  162. zachary.b@gmail.com

    Wow, a whole lot of you just sound like self-important a-holes who just don’t get it…
    |
    With the exception of a Dell Mini 9 that I bought recently (and that I am using right now) I’ve been computing solely on Mac hardware for the last decade.
    |
    Personally speaking I find the build quality on the Mini 9 to be more than adequate. The plastic body is solidly built, easy to crack open to improve the RAM or add a larger SSD, and the size is perfect for throwing into a bag or purse for light computing on the go.
    |
    From the way you describe it I wonder if the unit you used was defective, particularly when it comes to the battery. The battery in my unit is held solidly in place and doesn’t budge even with repeated prodding.
    |
    Sure, the keyboard is a little small and the key layout is a bit questionable, and the screen is a little dim and a little smaller than I’d like, but as far as I’m concerned it’s a fair exchange for the almost-pocketable size of the Mini 9.
    |
    I can afford a Mac. In fact I own several and I like them a lot. But until Apple comes out with an ultra-mini PC I’m more than happy with my Dell Mini 9.

    Reply
  163. zachary.b@gmail.com

    Wow, a whole lot of you just sound like self-important a-holes who just don’t get it…
    |
    With the exception of a Dell Mini 9 that I bought recently (and that I am using right now) I’ve been computing solely on Mac hardware for the last decade.
    |
    Personally speaking I find the build quality on the Mini 9 to be more than adequate. The plastic body is solidly built, easy to crack open to improve the RAM or add a larger SSD, and the size is perfect for throwing into a bag or purse for light computing on the go.
    |
    From the way you describe it I wonder if the unit you used was defective, particularly when it comes to the battery. The battery in my unit is held solidly in place and doesn’t budge even with repeated prodding.
    |
    Sure, the keyboard is a little small and the key layout is a bit questionable, and the screen is a little dim and a little smaller than I’d like, but as far as I’m concerned it’s a fair exchange for the almost-pocketable size of the Mini 9.
    |
    I can afford a Mac. In fact I own several and I like them a lot. But until Apple comes out with an ultra-mini PC I’m more than happy with my Dell Mini 9.

    Reply
  164. zachary.b@gmail.com

    Wow, a whole lot of you just sound like self-important a-holes who just don’t get it…
    |
    With the exception of a Dell Mini 9 that I bought recently (and that I am using right now) I’ve been computing solely on Mac hardware for the last decade.
    |
    Personally speaking I find the build quality on the Mini 9 to be more than adequate. The plastic body is solidly built, easy to crack open to improve the RAM or add a larger SSD, and the size is perfect for throwing into a bag or purse for light computing on the go.
    |
    From the way you describe it I wonder if the unit you used was defective, particularly when it comes to the battery. The battery in my unit is held solidly in place and doesn’t budge even with repeated prodding.
    |
    Sure, the keyboard is a little small and the key layout is a bit questionable, and the screen is a little dim and a little smaller than I’d like, but as far as I’m concerned it’s a fair exchange for the almost-pocketable size of the Mini 9.
    |
    I can afford a Mac. In fact I own several and I like them a lot. But until Apple comes out with an ultra-mini PC I’m more than happy with my Dell Mini 9.

    Reply
  165. zachary.b@gmail.com

    Wow, a whole lot of you just sound like self-important a-holes who just don’t get it…
    |
    With the exception of a Dell Mini 9 that I bought recently (and that I am using right now) I’ve been computing solely on Mac hardware for the last decade.
    |
    Personally speaking I find the build quality on the Mini 9 to be more than adequate. The plastic body is solidly built, easy to crack open to improve the RAM or add a larger SSD, and the size is perfect for throwing into a bag or purse for light computing on the go.
    |
    From the way you describe it I wonder if the unit you used was defective, particularly when it comes to the battery. The battery in my unit is held solidly in place and doesn’t budge even with repeated prodding.
    |
    Sure, the keyboard is a little small and the key layout is a bit questionable, and the screen is a little dim and a little smaller than I’d like, but as far as I’m concerned it’s a fair exchange for the almost-pocketable size of the Mini 9.
    |
    I can afford a Mac. In fact I own several and I like them a lot. But until Apple comes out with an ultra-mini PC I’m more than happy with my Dell Mini 9.

    Reply
  166. nathankras@comcast.net

    In defense of a netbook:

    I am not an apologist. When I was considering buying a netbook, one of the reasons that I used was: “It will be like an insurance policy for my macbook.” I already take my macbook everywhere, and it will be a relief to take a computer that is 2.3lb or so, and costs as much as 2 years of macbook insurance policy. I bought the cheapest dell netbook possible, at $200. Also, I already had a keyboard (this one in case you wonder: http://is.gd/x2Gm- (thats a tinyurl with a preview)). Unlike the prevailing opinion here, I had no illusions that my netbook would be a full computer, I didn’t put OSX on it, and I didn’t expect it to do everything my other computer can do. I would say that this failure is a case of over-high expectations.

    Reply
  167. nathankras@comcast.net

    In defense of a netbook:

    I am not an apologist. When I was considering buying a netbook, one of the reasons that I used was: “It will be like an insurance policy for my macbook.” I already take my macbook everywhere, and it will be a relief to take a computer that is 2.3lb or so, and costs as much as 2 years of macbook insurance policy. I bought the cheapest dell netbook possible, at $200. Also, I already had a keyboard (this one in case you wonder: http://is.gd/x2Gm- (thats a tinyurl with a preview)). Unlike the prevailing opinion here, I had no illusions that my netbook would be a full computer, I didn’t put OSX on it, and I didn’t expect it to do everything my other computer can do. I would say that this failure is a case of over-high expectations.

    Reply
  168. nathankras@comcast.net

    In defense of a netbook:

    I am not an apologist. When I was considering buying a netbook, one of the reasons that I used was: “It will be like an insurance policy for my macbook.” I already take my macbook everywhere, and it will be a relief to take a computer that is 2.3lb or so, and costs as much as 2 years of macbook insurance policy. I bought the cheapest dell netbook possible, at $200. Also, I already had a keyboard (this one in case you wonder: http://is.gd/x2Gm- (thats a tinyurl with a preview)). Unlike the prevailing opinion here, I had no illusions that my netbook would be a full computer, I didn’t put OSX on it, and I didn’t expect it to do everything my other computer can do. I would say that this failure is a case of over-high expectations.

    Reply
  169. nathankras@comcast.net

    In defense of a netbook:

    I am not an apologist. When I was considering buying a netbook, one of the reasons that I used was: “It will be like an insurance policy for my macbook.” I already take my macbook everywhere, and it will be a relief to take a computer that is 2.3lb or so, and costs as much as 2 years of macbook insurance policy. I bought the cheapest dell netbook possible, at $200. Also, I already had a keyboard (this one in case you wonder: http://is.gd/x2Gm- (thats a tinyurl with a preview)). Unlike the prevailing opinion here, I had no illusions that my netbook would be a full computer, I didn’t put OSX on it, and I didn’t expect it to do everything my other computer can do. I would say that this failure is a case of over-high expectations.

    Reply
  170. nathankras@comcast.net

    In defense of a netbook:

    I am not an apologist. When I was considering buying a netbook, one of the reasons that I used was: “It will be like an insurance policy for my macbook.” I already take my macbook everywhere, and it will be a relief to take a computer that is 2.3lb or so, and costs as much as 2 years of macbook insurance policy. I bought the cheapest dell netbook possible, at $200. Also, I already had a keyboard (this one in case you wonder: http://is.gd/x2Gm- (thats a tinyurl with a preview)). Unlike the prevailing opinion here, I had no illusions that my netbook would be a full computer, I didn’t put OSX on it, and I didn’t expect it to do everything my other computer can do. I would say that this failure is a case of over-high expectations.

    Reply
  171. jimsspambox@gmail.com

    This was actually a good write as you expressed why YOU didnt like it, and you managed to keep things in perspective and acknowledge that the netbook does have its uses. You also indirectly acknowledged that most people that explore the hackintosh option are doing so because of the ridiculously priced Apple products. Obviously my netbook is not my daily driver, and it has its issues, but overall for 300$, and my needs, I couldnt be more happy with its performance.

    Reply
  172. jimsspambox@gmail.com

    This was actually a good write as you expressed why YOU didnt like it, and you managed to keep things in perspective and acknowledge that the netbook does have its uses. You also indirectly acknowledged that most people that explore the hackintosh option are doing so because of the ridiculously priced Apple products. Obviously my netbook is not my daily driver, and it has its issues, but overall for 300$, and my needs, I couldnt be more happy with its performance.

    Reply
  173. jimsspambox@gmail.com

    This was actually a good write as you expressed why YOU didnt like it, and you managed to keep things in perspective and acknowledge that the netbook does have its uses. You also indirectly acknowledged that most people that explore the hackintosh option are doing so because of the ridiculously priced Apple products. Obviously my netbook is not my daily driver, and it has its issues, but overall for 300$, and my needs, I couldnt be more happy with its performance.

    Reply
  174. jimsspambox@gmail.com

    This was actually a good write as you expressed why YOU didnt like it, and you managed to keep things in perspective and acknowledge that the netbook does have its uses. You also indirectly acknowledged that most people that explore the hackintosh option are doing so because of the ridiculously priced Apple products. Obviously my netbook is not my daily driver, and it has its issues, but overall for 300$, and my needs, I couldnt be more happy with its performance.

    Reply
  175. jimsspambox@gmail.com

    This was actually a good write as you expressed why YOU didnt like it, and you managed to keep things in perspective and acknowledge that the netbook does have its uses. You also indirectly acknowledged that most people that explore the hackintosh option are doing so because of the ridiculously priced Apple products. Obviously my netbook is not my daily driver, and it has its issues, but overall for 300$, and my needs, I couldnt be more happy with its performance.

    Reply
  176. veshman@veshman.com

    hi, nice article. i agree with you on the points you bring up. my brother just backpacked through india with an MSI Wind hackintosh/hackb00k because of the size/weight factor, but after his month of travels, he found it very disappointing and wasn’t impressed at all. he felt it wasn’t worth the effort to bring that computer along. (5 years ago I backpacked through india with 12″ ibook G4 and it was great..was able to blog and write and do photos, etc).

    so then i decided to keep the msi wind around as a “house computer” that’s just sort of around and available for quick little tasks…like an appliance…e.g. look at something real quick online, follow a recipe on it, etc. none of us in the household enjoyed using the computer so it has just sat there, doing nothing.

    before everyone who is a netbook fan gets up in arms about this, i’m not saying the computer isn’t functional. it’s just not a pleasure to use. sure, you *can* get used to it, but since we already have a bunch of other laptops in the house, we don’t see the need.

    with the MSI, the build quality is not that great, and the most annoying part of using the computer is how hard it is to press the mouse button.

    Reply
  177. veshman@veshman.com

    hi, nice article. i agree with you on the points you bring up. my brother just backpacked through india with an MSI Wind hackintosh/hackb00k because of the size/weight factor, but after his month of travels, he found it very disappointing and wasn’t impressed at all. he felt it wasn’t worth the effort to bring that computer along. (5 years ago I backpacked through india with 12″ ibook G4 and it was great..was able to blog and write and do photos, etc).

    so then i decided to keep the msi wind around as a “house computer” that’s just sort of around and available for quick little tasks…like an appliance…e.g. look at something real quick online, follow a recipe on it, etc. none of us in the household enjoyed using the computer so it has just sat there, doing nothing.

    before everyone who is a netbook fan gets up in arms about this, i’m not saying the computer isn’t functional. it’s just not a pleasure to use. sure, you *can* get used to it, but since we already have a bunch of other laptops in the house, we don’t see the need.

    with the MSI, the build quality is not that great, and the most annoying part of using the computer is how hard it is to press the mouse button.

    Reply
  178. veshman@veshman.com

    hi, nice article. i agree with you on the points you bring up. my brother just backpacked through india with an MSI Wind hackintosh/hackb00k because of the size/weight factor, but after his month of travels, he found it very disappointing and wasn’t impressed at all. he felt it wasn’t worth the effort to bring that computer along. (5 years ago I backpacked through india with 12″ ibook G4 and it was great..was able to blog and write and do photos, etc).

    so then i decided to keep the msi wind around as a “house computer” that’s just sort of around and available for quick little tasks…like an appliance…e.g. look at something real quick online, follow a recipe on it, etc. none of us in the household enjoyed using the computer so it has just sat there, doing nothing.

    before everyone who is a netbook fan gets up in arms about this, i’m not saying the computer isn’t functional. it’s just not a pleasure to use. sure, you *can* get used to it, but since we already have a bunch of other laptops in the house, we don’t see the need.

    with the MSI, the build quality is not that great, and the most annoying part of using the computer is how hard it is to press the mouse button.

    Reply
  179. veshman@veshman.com

    hi, nice article. i agree with you on the points you bring up. my brother just backpacked through india with an MSI Wind hackintosh/hackb00k because of the size/weight factor, but after his month of travels, he found it very disappointing and wasn’t impressed at all. he felt it wasn’t worth the effort to bring that computer along. (5 years ago I backpacked through india with 12″ ibook G4 and it was great..was able to blog and write and do photos, etc).

    so then i decided to keep the msi wind around as a “house computer” that’s just sort of around and available for quick little tasks…like an appliance…e.g. look at something real quick online, follow a recipe on it, etc. none of us in the household enjoyed using the computer so it has just sat there, doing nothing.

    before everyone who is a netbook fan gets up in arms about this, i’m not saying the computer isn’t functional. it’s just not a pleasure to use. sure, you *can* get used to it, but since we already have a bunch of other laptops in the house, we don’t see the need.

    with the MSI, the build quality is not that great, and the most annoying part of using the computer is how hard it is to press the mouse button.

    Reply
  180. veshman@veshman.com

    hi, nice article. i agree with you on the points you bring up. my brother just backpacked through india with an MSI Wind hackintosh/hackb00k because of the size/weight factor, but after his month of travels, he found it very disappointing and wasn’t impressed at all. he felt it wasn’t worth the effort to bring that computer along. (5 years ago I backpacked through india with 12″ ibook G4 and it was great..was able to blog and write and do photos, etc).

    so then i decided to keep the msi wind around as a “house computer” that’s just sort of around and available for quick little tasks…like an appliance…e.g. look at something real quick online, follow a recipe on it, etc. none of us in the household enjoyed using the computer so it has just sat there, doing nothing.

    before everyone who is a netbook fan gets up in arms about this, i’m not saying the computer isn’t functional. it’s just not a pleasure to use. sure, you *can* get used to it, but since we already have a bunch of other laptops in the house, we don’t see the need.

    with the MSI, the build quality is not that great, and the most annoying part of using the computer is how hard it is to press the mouse button.

    Reply
  181. ckilner@marburylaw.com

    Interesting article and comments. I think it boils down to expectations and usage. Netbooks are popular because #1 – they are inexpensive; #2 – very portable; and #3 useful for light computing tasks. Most think light computing is web, email, word processing.
    Dave (the author) wanted to use the light, cheap Mini 9 for word processing… but was frustrated by the cramped keyboard and tiny trackpad. As a power user, he also wanted to use the System Pref panes that don’t fit the screen… so the Mini 9 didn’t meet his expectations for the intended use.
    I’m a long-time Mac-user… my expectations and usage are mostly basic stuff that netbooks and a Mini 9 hackb00k could handle – web and email…but I think I’d hate the tiny screen. My household has 6 Macs in daily use – all PPC, all >5 years old. The G4s (eMac, Cube, Quicksilver and Sawtooth) run Leopard, the G3 iBooks (300MHz Clamshell and 12″ 800MHz icebook) run Tiger. The 800×600 screen of my daughter’s Clamshell iBook drives me crazy. My 800MHz iBook has a full-sized keyboard and 1024×768 screen and fills all the needs of a netbook for me… but I also don’t watch videos, etc.
    My Cube is old, but souped-up (800MHz, 2G RAM, 160GB HDD, GeForce 6200 video) and does all the basics fine… iDVD requires some patience, but I’m old-school and am accustomed to overnight renders. Sure, I’d love a newer, faster Mac or a tiny hackb00k, but what I have works fine for now. Like I said – expectations and usage.

    Reply
  182. ckilner@marburylaw.com

    Interesting article and comments. I think it boils down to expectations and usage. Netbooks are popular because #1 – they are inexpensive; #2 – very portable; and #3 useful for light computing tasks. Most think light computing is web, email, word processing.
    Dave (the author) wanted to use the light, cheap Mini 9 for word processing… but was frustrated by the cramped keyboard and tiny trackpad. As a power user, he also wanted to use the System Pref panes that don’t fit the screen… so the Mini 9 didn’t meet his expectations for the intended use.
    I’m a long-time Mac-user… my expectations and usage are mostly basic stuff that netbooks and a Mini 9 hackb00k could handle – web and email…but I think I’d hate the tiny screen. My household has 6 Macs in daily use – all PPC, all >5 years old. The G4s (eMac, Cube, Quicksilver and Sawtooth) run Leopard, the G3 iBooks (300MHz Clamshell and 12″ 800MHz icebook) run Tiger. The 800×600 screen of my daughter’s Clamshell iBook drives me crazy. My 800MHz iBook has a full-sized keyboard and 1024×768 screen and fills all the needs of a netbook for me… but I also don’t watch videos, etc.
    My Cube is old, but souped-up (800MHz, 2G RAM, 160GB HDD, GeForce 6200 video) and does all the basics fine… iDVD requires some patience, but I’m old-school and am accustomed to overnight renders. Sure, I’d love a newer, faster Mac or a tiny hackb00k, but what I have works fine for now. Like I said – expectations and usage.

    Reply
  183. ckilner@marburylaw.com

    Interesting article and comments. I think it boils down to expectations and usage. Netbooks are popular because #1 – they are inexpensive; #2 – very portable; and #3 useful for light computing tasks. Most think light computing is web, email, word processing.
    Dave (the author) wanted to use the light, cheap Mini 9 for word processing… but was frustrated by the cramped keyboard and tiny trackpad. As a power user, he also wanted to use the System Pref panes that don’t fit the screen… so the Mini 9 didn’t meet his expectations for the intended use.
    I’m a long-time Mac-user… my expectations and usage are mostly basic stuff that netbooks and a Mini 9 hackb00k could handle – web and email…but I think I’d hate the tiny screen. My household has 6 Macs in daily use – all PPC, all >5 years old. The G4s (eMac, Cube, Quicksilver and Sawtooth) run Leopard, the G3 iBooks (300MHz Clamshell and 12″ 800MHz icebook) run Tiger. The 800×600 screen of my daughter’s Clamshell iBook drives me crazy. My 800MHz iBook has a full-sized keyboard and 1024×768 screen and fills all the needs of a netbook for me… but I also don’t watch videos, etc.
    My Cube is old, but souped-up (800MHz, 2G RAM, 160GB HDD, GeForce 6200 video) and does all the basics fine… iDVD requires some patience, but I’m old-school and am accustomed to overnight renders. Sure, I’d love a newer, faster Mac or a tiny hackb00k, but what I have works fine for now. Like I said – expectations and usage.

    Reply
  184. ckilner@marburylaw.com

    Interesting article and comments. I think it boils down to expectations and usage. Netbooks are popular because #1 – they are inexpensive; #2 – very portable; and #3 useful for light computing tasks. Most think light computing is web, email, word processing.
    Dave (the author) wanted to use the light, cheap Mini 9 for word processing… but was frustrated by the cramped keyboard and tiny trackpad. As a power user, he also wanted to use the System Pref panes that don’t fit the screen… so the Mini 9 didn’t meet his expectations for the intended use.
    I’m a long-time Mac-user… my expectations and usage are mostly basic stuff that netbooks and a Mini 9 hackb00k could handle – web and email…but I think I’d hate the tiny screen. My household has 6 Macs in daily use – all PPC, all >5 years old. The G4s (eMac, Cube, Quicksilver and Sawtooth) run Leopard, the G3 iBooks (300MHz Clamshell and 12″ 800MHz icebook) run Tiger. The 800×600 screen of my daughter’s Clamshell iBook drives me crazy. My 800MHz iBook has a full-sized keyboard and 1024×768 screen and fills all the needs of a netbook for me… but I also don’t watch videos, etc.
    My Cube is old, but souped-up (800MHz, 2G RAM, 160GB HDD, GeForce 6200 video) and does all the basics fine… iDVD requires some patience, but I’m old-school and am accustomed to overnight renders. Sure, I’d love a newer, faster Mac or a tiny hackb00k, but what I have works fine for now. Like I said – expectations and usage.

    Reply
  185. ckilner@marburylaw.com

    Interesting article and comments. I think it boils down to expectations and usage. Netbooks are popular because #1 – they are inexpensive; #2 – very portable; and #3 useful for light computing tasks. Most think light computing is web, email, word processing.
    Dave (the author) wanted to use the light, cheap Mini 9 for word processing… but was frustrated by the cramped keyboard and tiny trackpad. As a power user, he also wanted to use the System Pref panes that don’t fit the screen… so the Mini 9 didn’t meet his expectations for the intended use.
    I’m a long-time Mac-user… my expectations and usage are mostly basic stuff that netbooks and a Mini 9 hackb00k could handle – web and email…but I think I’d hate the tiny screen. My household has 6 Macs in daily use – all PPC, all >5 years old. The G4s (eMac, Cube, Quicksilver and Sawtooth) run Leopard, the G3 iBooks (300MHz Clamshell and 12″ 800MHz icebook) run Tiger. The 800×600 screen of my daughter’s Clamshell iBook drives me crazy. My 800MHz iBook has a full-sized keyboard and 1024×768 screen and fills all the needs of a netbook for me… but I also don’t watch videos, etc.
    My Cube is old, but souped-up (800MHz, 2G RAM, 160GB HDD, GeForce 6200 video) and does all the basics fine… iDVD requires some patience, but I’m old-school and am accustomed to overnight renders. Sure, I’d love a newer, faster Mac or a tiny hackb00k, but what I have works fine for now. Like I said – expectations and usage.

    Reply
  186. kennyl98@gmail.com

    IT just amazes me that those who say netbooks are no good because of small screen, tiny keyboard, etc., are the same people who gleefully squint at iPhones and type away on those infernal touch screen keyboards.

    Netbooks CLEARLY have a place in the computing universe. If you want something light to take with you, to check your mail, do a little light browsing or document creation, they’re perfectly fine, I’d think.

    If Apple doesn’t want to play in the space, well, fine. But as n AAPL shareholder, I think they’re needlessly writing off the most rapidly growing space in computer technology. They could find a way, as they always do, of building a better mousetrap. The usual formula of 50 percent more “bling” for 75-100 percent price premium would seem to apply here.

    Anyway, its been fun, but beaten to death. Enjoy whatever you buy/use for your light mobility needs.

    Cheers
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  187. kennyl98@gmail.com

    IT just amazes me that those who say netbooks are no good because of small screen, tiny keyboard, etc., are the same people who gleefully squint at iPhones and type away on those infernal touch screen keyboards.

    Netbooks CLEARLY have a place in the computing universe. If you want something light to take with you, to check your mail, do a little light browsing or document creation, they’re perfectly fine, I’d think.

    If Apple doesn’t want to play in the space, well, fine. But as n AAPL shareholder, I think they’re needlessly writing off the most rapidly growing space in computer technology. They could find a way, as they always do, of building a better mousetrap. The usual formula of 50 percent more “bling” for 75-100 percent price premium would seem to apply here.

    Anyway, its been fun, but beaten to death. Enjoy whatever you buy/use for your light mobility needs.

    Cheers
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  188. kennyl98@gmail.com

    IT just amazes me that those who say netbooks are no good because of small screen, tiny keyboard, etc., are the same people who gleefully squint at iPhones and type away on those infernal touch screen keyboards.

    Netbooks CLEARLY have a place in the computing universe. If you want something light to take with you, to check your mail, do a little light browsing or document creation, they’re perfectly fine, I’d think.

    If Apple doesn’t want to play in the space, well, fine. But as n AAPL shareholder, I think they’re needlessly writing off the most rapidly growing space in computer technology. They could find a way, as they always do, of building a better mousetrap. The usual formula of 50 percent more “bling” for 75-100 percent price premium would seem to apply here.

    Anyway, its been fun, but beaten to death. Enjoy whatever you buy/use for your light mobility needs.

    Cheers
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  189. kennyl98@gmail.com

    IT just amazes me that those who say netbooks are no good because of small screen, tiny keyboard, etc., are the same people who gleefully squint at iPhones and type away on those infernal touch screen keyboards.

    Netbooks CLEARLY have a place in the computing universe. If you want something light to take with you, to check your mail, do a little light browsing or document creation, they’re perfectly fine, I’d think.

    If Apple doesn’t want to play in the space, well, fine. But as n AAPL shareholder, I think they’re needlessly writing off the most rapidly growing space in computer technology. They could find a way, as they always do, of building a better mousetrap. The usual formula of 50 percent more “bling” for 75-100 percent price premium would seem to apply here.

    Anyway, its been fun, but beaten to death. Enjoy whatever you buy/use for your light mobility needs.

    Cheers
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  190. kennyl98@gmail.com

    IT just amazes me that those who say netbooks are no good because of small screen, tiny keyboard, etc., are the same people who gleefully squint at iPhones and type away on those infernal touch screen keyboards.

    Netbooks CLEARLY have a place in the computing universe. If you want something light to take with you, to check your mail, do a little light browsing or document creation, they’re perfectly fine, I’d think.

    If Apple doesn’t want to play in the space, well, fine. But as n AAPL shareholder, I think they’re needlessly writing off the most rapidly growing space in computer technology. They could find a way, as they always do, of building a better mousetrap. The usual formula of 50 percent more “bling” for 75-100 percent price premium would seem to apply here.

    Anyway, its been fun, but beaten to death. Enjoy whatever you buy/use for your light mobility needs.

    Cheers
    Kenny in NJ

    Reply
  191. barney@gmail.com

    I do not know about a dell mini, but my home built intel core i7 is running 10.5.6 and it blows anything Mac makes for twice as much out of the water. And I dont give a darn about apple care b.s. To replace my motherboard takes 30 minutes and cost $125.

    Reply
  192. barney@gmail.com

    I do not know about a dell mini, but my home built intel core i7 is running 10.5.6 and it blows anything Mac makes for twice as much out of the water. And I dont give a darn about apple care b.s. To replace my motherboard takes 30 minutes and cost $125.

    Reply
  193. barney@gmail.com

    I do not know about a dell mini, but my home built intel core i7 is running 10.5.6 and it blows anything Mac makes for twice as much out of the water. And I dont give a darn about apple care b.s. To replace my motherboard takes 30 minutes and cost $125.

    Reply
  194. barney@gmail.com

    I do not know about a dell mini, but my home built intel core i7 is running 10.5.6 and it blows anything Mac makes for twice as much out of the water. And I dont give a darn about apple care b.s. To replace my motherboard takes 30 minutes and cost $125.

    Reply
  195. barney@gmail.com

    I do not know about a dell mini, but my home built intel core i7 is running 10.5.6 and it blows anything Mac makes for twice as much out of the water. And I dont give a darn about apple care b.s. To replace my motherboard takes 30 minutes and cost $125.

    Reply
  196. toby@calumny.org

    @Scot – “For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores.” Which machine would that be? The Mini 9 has a single core Atom in it, and sadly everything I’ve read suggests that Intel won’t allow any manufacturer to put a dual core Atom in a laptop (they’re intended for set-top boxes, I take it).

    Reply
  197. toby@calumny.org

    @Scot – “For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores.” Which machine would that be? The Mini 9 has a single core Atom in it, and sadly everything I’ve read suggests that Intel won’t allow any manufacturer to put a dual core Atom in a laptop (they’re intended for set-top boxes, I take it).

    Reply
  198. toby@calumny.org

    @Scot – “For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores.” Which machine would that be? The Mini 9 has a single core Atom in it, and sadly everything I’ve read suggests that Intel won’t allow any manufacturer to put a dual core Atom in a laptop (they’re intended for set-top boxes, I take it).

    Reply
  199. toby@calumny.org

    @Scot – “For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores.” Which machine would that be? The Mini 9 has a single core Atom in it, and sadly everything I’ve read suggests that Intel won’t allow any manufacturer to put a dual core Atom in a laptop (they’re intended for set-top boxes, I take it).

    Reply
  200. toby@calumny.org

    @Scot – “For approximately $350 you get a machine with not one but two cores.” Which machine would that be? The Mini 9 has a single core Atom in it, and sadly everything I’ve read suggests that Intel won’t allow any manufacturer to put a dual core Atom in a laptop (they’re intended for set-top boxes, I take it).

    Reply
  201. billhau@hotmail.com

    Its interesting. The author of “The Netbook Experiment” reminds me of a old story of a frog sitting on the bottom of a well and look up and lament the universe is such a small place therefore proclaim “I’ve seen it all”. I think “Netbook” is a fast growing section of the laptop market and if the author’s experiment is to be believed there will be a lot of red faces not to mention red ink within the computer manufacturing industry. Like any “NEW” product type indeed any product it always subject to product improvement/correction and market vagaries. If the product is no good the market would not be able to sustain it. It’s a pity, a Mini can never out-run a Ferrari (therefore the engineering must be no good!!!) – always living in hope of course. BTW I’m a life long Apple user from OS9 to OSX.

    Reply
  202. billhau@hotmail.com

    Its interesting. The author of “The Netbook Experiment” reminds me of a old story of a frog sitting on the bottom of a well and look up and lament the universe is such a small place therefore proclaim “I’ve seen it all”. I think “Netbook” is a fast growing section of the laptop market and if the author’s experiment is to be believed there will be a lot of red faces not to mention red ink within the computer manufacturing industry. Like any “NEW” product type indeed any product it always subject to product improvement/correction and market vagaries. If the product is no good the market would not be able to sustain it. It’s a pity, a Mini can never out-run a Ferrari (therefore the engineering must be no good!!!) – always living in hope of course. BTW I’m a life long Apple user from OS9 to OSX.

    Reply
  203. billhau@hotmail.com

    Its interesting. The author of “The Netbook Experiment” reminds me of a old story of a frog sitting on the bottom of a well and look up and lament the universe is such a small place therefore proclaim “I’ve seen it all”. I think “Netbook” is a fast growing section of the laptop market and if the author’s experiment is to be believed there will be a lot of red faces not to mention red ink within the computer manufacturing industry. Like any “NEW” product type indeed any product it always subject to product improvement/correction and market vagaries. If the product is no good the market would not be able to sustain it. It’s a pity, a Mini can never out-run a Ferrari (therefore the engineering must be no good!!!) – always living in hope of course. BTW I’m a life long Apple user from OS9 to OSX.

    Reply
  204. billhau@hotmail.com

    Its interesting. The author of “The Netbook Experiment” reminds me of a old story of a frog sitting on the bottom of a well and look up and lament the universe is such a small place therefore proclaim “I’ve seen it all”. I think “Netbook” is a fast growing section of the laptop market and if the author’s experiment is to be believed there will be a lot of red faces not to mention red ink within the computer manufacturing industry. Like any “NEW” product type indeed any product it always subject to product improvement/correction and market vagaries. If the product is no good the market would not be able to sustain it. It’s a pity, a Mini can never out-run a Ferrari (therefore the engineering must be no good!!!) – always living in hope of course. BTW I’m a life long Apple user from OS9 to OSX.

    Reply
  205. billhau@hotmail.com

    Its interesting. The author of “The Netbook Experiment” reminds me of a old story of a frog sitting on the bottom of a well and look up and lament the universe is such a small place therefore proclaim “I’ve seen it all”. I think “Netbook” is a fast growing section of the laptop market and if the author’s experiment is to be believed there will be a lot of red faces not to mention red ink within the computer manufacturing industry. Like any “NEW” product type indeed any product it always subject to product improvement/correction and market vagaries. If the product is no good the market would not be able to sustain it. It’s a pity, a Mini can never out-run a Ferrari (therefore the engineering must be no good!!!) – always living in hope of course. BTW I’m a life long Apple user from OS9 to OSX.

    Reply
  206. david@macsparky.com

    @Bill I don’t agree. I was careful in the original posting to say if it works for you, then great. However, I didn’t work for me. With the emergence of very powerful handheld devices, I think netbooks are going to be niche product at best.

    Reply
  207. david@macsparky.com

    @Bill I don’t agree. I was careful in the original posting to say if it works for you, then great. However, I didn’t work for me. With the emergence of very powerful handheld devices, I think netbooks are going to be niche product at best.

    Reply
  208. david@macsparky.com

    @Bill I don’t agree. I was careful in the original posting to say if it works for you, then great. However, I didn’t work for me. With the emergence of very powerful handheld devices, I think netbooks are going to be niche product at best.

    Reply
  209. david@macsparky.com

    @Bill I don’t agree. I was careful in the original posting to say if it works for you, then great. However, I didn’t work for me. With the emergence of very powerful handheld devices, I think netbooks are going to be niche product at best.

    Reply
  210. david@macsparky.com

    @Bill I don’t agree. I was careful in the original posting to say if it works for you, then great. However, I didn’t work for me. With the emergence of very powerful handheld devices, I think netbooks are going to be niche product at best.

    Reply
  211. perfectscores@hotmail.com

    If a netbook fits your needs, get one. If not, don’t. Disparaging users who buy netbooks as being poor or clueless is just immature fanboy-izm. Netbooks have a very useful niche among frequent travelers who don’t want the heft (and liability) of a shiny, pricey, Macbook theft-magnet. Being cheap, nigh disposable, is an advantage if you’re visiting 3rd world countries for extended periods, blogging and emailing from a guesthouse in SE Asia, killing time waiting for an airport connection, etc.

    I wonder how many of the detractors here actually travel, I mean really travel, with their Macbook Pros and Airs. Not a weekend car trip or lugging your computer bag from car-to-office and back, nor a quick run to the local coffee shop to pose with the other aspiring writers and hipsters, but really walking all day with your laptop in a backpack, travelling for weeks or months in areas with spotty internet access and frequent brownouts and blackouts. In these conditions a cheap, sub-3lb netbook is indeed very handy.
    When I’m home I’ll enjoy my 24″ iMac, I have no desire to stress about a $2K MBP being in my bag when I’m on the road.
    Peace y’all.

    Reply
  212. perfectscores@hotmail.com

    If a netbook fits your needs, get one. If not, don’t. Disparaging users who buy netbooks as being poor or clueless is just immature fanboy-izm. Netbooks have a very useful niche among frequent travelers who don’t want the heft (and liability) of a shiny, pricey, Macbook theft-magnet. Being cheap, nigh disposable, is an advantage if you’re visiting 3rd world countries for extended periods, blogging and emailing from a guesthouse in SE Asia, killing time waiting for an airport connection, etc.

    I wonder how many of the detractors here actually travel, I mean really travel, with their Macbook Pros and Airs. Not a weekend car trip or lugging your computer bag from car-to-office and back, nor a quick run to the local coffee shop to pose with the other aspiring writers and hipsters, but really walking all day with your laptop in a backpack, travelling for weeks or months in areas with spotty internet access and frequent brownouts and blackouts. In these conditions a cheap, sub-3lb netbook is indeed very handy.
    When I’m home I’ll enjoy my 24″ iMac, I have no desire to stress about a $2K MBP being in my bag when I’m on the road.
    Peace y’all.

    Reply
  213. perfectscores@hotmail.com

    If a netbook fits your needs, get one. If not, don’t. Disparaging users who buy netbooks as being poor or clueless is just immature fanboy-izm. Netbooks have a very useful niche among frequent travelers who don’t want the heft (and liability) of a shiny, pricey, Macbook theft-magnet. Being cheap, nigh disposable, is an advantage if you’re visiting 3rd world countries for extended periods, blogging and emailing from a guesthouse in SE Asia, killing time waiting for an airport connection, etc.

    I wonder how many of the detractors here actually travel, I mean really travel, with their Macbook Pros and Airs. Not a weekend car trip or lugging your computer bag from car-to-office and back, nor a quick run to the local coffee shop to pose with the other aspiring writers and hipsters, but really walking all day with your laptop in a backpack, travelling for weeks or months in areas with spotty internet access and frequent brownouts and blackouts. In these conditions a cheap, sub-3lb netbook is indeed very handy.
    When I’m home I’ll enjoy my 24″ iMac, I have no desire to stress about a $2K MBP being in my bag when I’m on the road.
    Peace y’all.

    Reply
  214. perfectscores@hotmail.com

    If a netbook fits your needs, get one. If not, don’t. Disparaging users who buy netbooks as being poor or clueless is just immature fanboy-izm. Netbooks have a very useful niche among frequent travelers who don’t want the heft (and liability) of a shiny, pricey, Macbook theft-magnet. Being cheap, nigh disposable, is an advantage if you’re visiting 3rd world countries for extended periods, blogging and emailing from a guesthouse in SE Asia, killing time waiting for an airport connection, etc.

    I wonder how many of the detractors here actually travel, I mean really travel, with their Macbook Pros and Airs. Not a weekend car trip or lugging your computer bag from car-to-office and back, nor a quick run to the local coffee shop to pose with the other aspiring writers and hipsters, but really walking all day with your laptop in a backpack, travelling for weeks or months in areas with spotty internet access and frequent brownouts and blackouts. In these conditions a cheap, sub-3lb netbook is indeed very handy.
    When I’m home I’ll enjoy my 24″ iMac, I have no desire to stress about a $2K MBP being in my bag when I’m on the road.
    Peace y’all.

    Reply
  215. perfectscores@hotmail.com

    If a netbook fits your needs, get one. If not, don’t. Disparaging users who buy netbooks as being poor or clueless is just immature fanboy-izm. Netbooks have a very useful niche among frequent travelers who don’t want the heft (and liability) of a shiny, pricey, Macbook theft-magnet. Being cheap, nigh disposable, is an advantage if you’re visiting 3rd world countries for extended periods, blogging and emailing from a guesthouse in SE Asia, killing time waiting for an airport connection, etc.

    I wonder how many of the detractors here actually travel, I mean really travel, with their Macbook Pros and Airs. Not a weekend car trip or lugging your computer bag from car-to-office and back, nor a quick run to the local coffee shop to pose with the other aspiring writers and hipsters, but really walking all day with your laptop in a backpack, travelling for weeks or months in areas with spotty internet access and frequent brownouts and blackouts. In these conditions a cheap, sub-3lb netbook is indeed very handy.
    When I’m home I’ll enjoy my 24″ iMac, I have no desire to stress about a $2K MBP being in my bag when I’m on the road.
    Peace y’all.

    Reply
  216. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve never disparaged NetBook users. I’ve actually gone out of my way to explain the benefits of them. My point is the cramped keyboard and screen are deal breakers for me.

    Reply
  217. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve never disparaged NetBook users. I’ve actually gone out of my way to explain the benefits of them. My point is the cramped keyboard and screen are deal breakers for me.

    Reply
  218. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve never disparaged NetBook users. I’ve actually gone out of my way to explain the benefits of them. My point is the cramped keyboard and screen are deal breakers for me.

    Reply
  219. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve never disparaged NetBook users. I’ve actually gone out of my way to explain the benefits of them. My point is the cramped keyboard and screen are deal breakers for me.

    Reply
  220. david@macsparky.com

    I’ve never disparaged NetBook users. I’ve actually gone out of my way to explain the benefits of them. My point is the cramped keyboard and screen are deal breakers for me.

    Reply
  221. mrhasnain95@gmail.com

    I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9" netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook.

    Reply
  222. mrhasnain95@gmail.com

    I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9" netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook.

    Reply
  223. mrhasnain95@gmail.com

    I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9" netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook.

    Reply
  224. mrhasnain95@gmail.com

    I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9" netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook.

    Reply
  225. mrhasnain95@gmail.com

    I think netbooks are just a fad. As mobile devices like the iPhone and T-Mobile G1 get more and more powerful, does the world really need a crippled device like a 9" netbook? I get more functionality out of the iPhone and G1 than I ever did with the netbook.

    Reply
  226. TheodoreJMarin@thankyou2010.com

    Small netbooks with 9 or 10 inch screens are really too tiny for convenient typing and reading from the screen. I'm going to buy a 12-inch ASUS netbook in a week or so. I've already tested it, and it's more of a laptop, just smaller. So you shouldn't judge all netbooks by just the small ones

    Reply
  227. TheodoreJMarin@thankyou2010.com

    Small netbooks with 9 or 10 inch screens are really too tiny for convenient typing and reading from the screen. I'm going to buy a 12-inch ASUS netbook in a week or so. I've already tested it, and it's more of a laptop, just smaller. So you shouldn't judge all netbooks by just the small ones

    Reply
  228. TheodoreJMarin@thankyou2010.com

    Small netbooks with 9 or 10 inch screens are really too tiny for convenient typing and reading from the screen. I'm going to buy a 12-inch ASUS netbook in a week or so. I've already tested it, and it's more of a laptop, just smaller. So you shouldn't judge all netbooks by just the small ones

    Reply
  229. TheodoreJMarin@thankyou2010.com

    Small netbooks with 9 or 10 inch screens are really too tiny for convenient typing and reading from the screen. I'm going to buy a 12-inch ASUS netbook in a week or so. I've already tested it, and it's more of a laptop, just smaller. So you shouldn't judge all netbooks by just the small ones

    Reply
  230. TheodoreJMarin@thankyou2010.com

    Small netbooks with 9 or 10 inch screens are really too tiny for convenient typing and reading from the screen. I'm going to buy a 12-inch ASUS netbook in a week or so. I've already tested it, and it's more of a laptop, just smaller. So you shouldn't judge all netbooks by just the small ones

    Reply
  231. dorianreading@gmail.com

    The problem w/ my Dell Mini hackintosh is audio — it doesn't work. Neither in or out. Otherwise, works fine. And it's small, light and easily carried, with full functionality for computing tasks. (Something phones and tablets don't have.)

    Reply
  232. dorianreading@gmail.com

    The problem w/ my Dell Mini hackintosh is audio — it doesn't work. Neither in or out. Otherwise, works fine. And it's small, light and easily carried, with full functionality for computing tasks. (Something phones and tablets don't have.)

    Reply
  233. dorianreading@gmail.com

    The problem w/ my Dell Mini hackintosh is audio — it doesn't work. Neither in or out. Otherwise, works fine. And it's small, light and easily carried, with full functionality for computing tasks. (Something phones and tablets don't have.)

    Reply
  234. dorianreading@gmail.com

    The problem w/ my Dell Mini hackintosh is audio — it doesn't work. Neither in or out. Otherwise, works fine. And it's small, light and easily carried, with full functionality for computing tasks. (Something phones and tablets don't have.)

    Reply
  235. dorianreading@gmail.com

    The problem w/ my Dell Mini hackintosh is audio — it doesn't work. Neither in or out. Otherwise, works fine. And it's small, light and easily carried, with full functionality for computing tasks. (Something phones and tablets don't have.)

    Reply

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